Negotiation Skills is a practical, interactive course that equips participants with the skills to successfully prepare, undertake, and conclude negotiations in formal and informal settings with government and non-government actors. The first two week...
 14 Oct 2019

Event
Many successful negotiators argue that the personal contact and the ‘human touch’ are crucial ingredients of negotiation success. Learning to negotiate is not a theoretical endeavour, but rather something that needs hands-on, practical experience. ...
 8 May 2018

Event
Dr Katharina (Kat) E Höne researches, writes, and teaches on a number of issues in the area of diplomacy, global governance, and the impact of technology on international relations. Over the last years, she has focused on research at the intersection...

People
Mrs Liz Galvez was a senior diplomat with the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, taking early retirement in 2006 with the rank of Counsellor. During her 33 year career, she served in a wide range of diplomatic jobs in London and several overseas pos...

People
Dr Alex Sceberras Trigona currently serves as Special Envoy to the Prime Minister of Malta. He is a Founder Member of DiploFoundation, and has been organising courses simulating international negotiations – bilateral and multilateral – at the Mediter...

People
We negotiate all the time in both personal and professional capacities. In order to improve the outcomes and achieve our goals, it is vital to reflect on the process of negotiation and develop specific meaningful mindsets, strategies, and tools. Neg...

Course
Can negotiation skills be taught? Some argue that they cannot; they are only acquired through practice. But while it is true that any skill is honed through deliberative practice, Prof. Raymond Saner, teacher of international and multi-stakeholder ne...
 14 Sep 2016

Blog post
We negotiate throughout our lives. We first learn to negotiate by simply imitating adults and then continue by somehow automatically developing our own patterns and approaches. The measure of our accomplishment is in how we succeed in daily life a...
 29 Aug 2016

Blog post
[UPDATE]Read the follow-upblog postand watch therecordingfrom the September WebDebate. During a debate on how to develop one of the core skills of diplomatic practice, the presenters will include examples and point to...
 6 Sep 2016

Event
Earn an accredited Master’s degree without taking time off work. The Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy guides working diplomats and international relations professionals through the theoretical and practical building blocks of ...

Course
What makes one set of words more convincing than another, and how can language best be put to work in the service of diplomacy and international relations?   This course promotes language awareness as a means of improving the skills of opinion shaper...

Course
Why do we need diplomats? Diplomats are members of a profession developed over many centuries. But why do we still need them in a world transformed by electronic communications? This course examines the nature of diplomacy; when it is appropriate;...

Course
Effective bilateral diplomacy is essential to advancing a country’s external interests. Bilateral diplomacy is a key building block of international relations, i.e. the way a pair of countries deals with each other. This course offers a practition...
Start date:   4 May 2020
Register
Course
Explore the origins of multilateral diplomacy and its evolution within a dynamic and rapidly changing environment. This course introduces participants to the diplomatic interaction among more than two actors, with particular emphasis on the multilat...

Course
Humanitarian diplomacy is persuading decision makers and opinion leaders to act, at all times, in the interests of vulnerable people, and with full respect for fundamental humanitarian principles. The rapid expansion of the number of humanitar...

Course
This journey through persuasion in diplomacy was initiated by Professor Kappeler’s long experience in both practicing diplomacy and in training diplomats. When the bells and whistles of diplomacy settle down, what remains, according to Prof. Kappeler...
Author: Various Authors

Books
Today, Diplo gathers to discuss “Persuasion, The Essence of Diplomacy.” I am intrigued by the conference contributions. Reading about the conference topic also inspired some new thinking on metaphors, an issue that has been my companion o...
 2 Apr 2013

Blog post

Description:

Ambassador Kishan Rana indicates the cultivation of relations and the credibility of diplomats as the basis for persuasion in diplomacy. He provides an initial taxonomy of the type of relations that diplomats should cultivate. When it comes to credibility, Ambassador Rana presents the main ways of developing and maintaining credibility in diplomatic relations. The more credible the diplomat, the more likely it is that their persuasion with local interlocutors will be successful.

Source: 
Persuasion, The Essence of Diplomacy
 Kishan Rana , 2012

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Let’s bring out the big questions: Should climate change negotiations be organised according to the “one state one vote” principle? This time between Christmas and New Year is called “in between the years” in Germany. I...
 29 Dec 2012

Blog post
Imagine that, for some reason, as of today all diplomatic negotiations have to be conducted online, through chat-rooms or ‘hypertext’ for instance, and in writing; diplomats start to exploit the Internet resources in full and consider the...
 21 Jul 2012

Blog post
The political spectrum in Hungary has been providing lots of food for thought and discussion in recent weeks.Topics like Internet governance, media censorship, anti-Semitism and europhobia are being tossed around in daily conversation. There&#3...
 7 Jul 2012

Blog post
E-diplomacy has attracted a lot of attention recently. Some new terms have been coined including Facebook diplomacy and Twitter diplomacy. The Arab Spring initiated a new wave of commentary on Internet-driven changes in international relations. &nbsp...
 14 Jun 2012

Blog post
Ancient Greece developed a unique way of settling disagreements among cities: hoplites met in a plain, fought for a day and abided by the outcome. “For those men, the purpose was now to settle the entire business, if not fairly, then at least d...
 22 Mar 2012

Blog post

Description:

The under-investigation in diplomatic studies of processes of persuasion in explaining diplomatic outcomes needs to be addressed in the interests of better scholarly explanations and diplomatic practice. Although such processes are implicit in nearly all concepts and practice of diplomacy, neither scholars nor practitioners explicitly investigate them. Yet other related fields of study and disciplines examine persuasion and demonstrate its explanatory value. Drawing on this literature, but also bearing in mind the nature of outcomes that diplomatic studies seeks to understand, this article offers a model of processes of persuasion and illustrates its potential for explaining a 2003 peace process negotiation in the Solomon Islands.

Source: 
Persuasion, The Essence of Diplomacy
 Pauline L. Kerr , 2010
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Kosovo’s path towards independence proved to be a difficult, elongated and complex process that entailed political as well as legal implications that are argued by many scholars, and analysts nowadays.

This paper gives an overview of the highly intricated negotiation process over Kosovo’s final status, encompassing a short historical analysis of the political events that finally led to the declaration of independence. The declaration of independence accelerated the international community to manage the consequences of this rather legitimate act by minimizing the disruption to the world public order but at the same time protecting the human rights.

Kosovo's statehood is supported and recognised as well as denied by different states and actors.

In this light, the paper tries to address the reaction of individual states, as well as legal complications of UNMIK’s withdrawal and EU mission deployment with a special focus on the political and legal implications.

Source: 
Dissertation library
 Shkendije Geci , 2008
 
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Of central concern in the field of negotiation is the use of ambiguity to find formulations acceptable to all parties. Professor Norman Scott looks at the contrasting roles of ambiguity and precision in conference diplomacy. He explains that while documents drafters usually try to avoid ambiguity, weaker parties to an agreement may have an interest in inserting ambiguous provisions, while those with a stronger position or more to gain will push for precision. Scott provides examples from a variety of trade and agricultural negotiations, stressing the different roles played by developing and developed countries, and the evolution of special terminology which has entrenched ambiguous concepts in this sort of negotiations.

Source: 
Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
 Norman Scott , 2001
 

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Professor Paul Sharp discusses negotiation with American mediators. He notes that most literature on negotiation is written to advise Americans and other Westerners about negotiating with foreigners. However, "for the diplomatic profession...how to talk to Americans is a much larger shared problem than how the Americans talk to everybody else." Sharp points out that many of the problems other nations encounter when dealing with Americans are not cultural at all, but common problems any nation faces when dealing with a richer and more powerful nation. As advice, he suggests the same rules that are given to American diplomats for dealing with others: show respect for other cultures and make necessary adjustments to avoid offence.

Source: 
Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
 Paul Sharp , 2001
 

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Professor Raymond Cohen writes that "when negotiation takes place across languages and cultures the scope for misunderstanding increases. So much of negotiation involves arguments about words and concepts that it cannot be assumed that language is secondary." With numerous examples of the culturally-grounded references, associations and nuances of certain words and phrases in English and the Middle Eastern languages (Arabic, Turkish, Farsi and Hebrew), Cohen introduces his project of developing a negotiating lexicon of the Middle East as a guide for conducting or following negotiations in those languages.

Source: 
Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
 Raymond Cohen , 2001
 

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In the preface below, Jovan Kurbalija and Hannah Slavik introduce the chapters in the book, and extract the general themes covered by the various authors.

Source: 
Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
 Jovan Kurbalija, Hannah Slavik , 2001

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