htab

Overview

 

 

 

 

Cyberspace has become an essential component of modern society. Critical societal infrastructure, the financial sector, governmental services, the security sector, schools, and hospitals are increasingly and irreversibly dependent on interconnectivity and the global network. So are citizens.

The merits of the open Internet are accompanied by risks. Such risks need to be approached comprehensively and systematically though the cooperation of all stakeholders. Many countries have adopted national cybersecurity strategies and related legislation, taking into account both security and freedoms. A growing number of countries have set up national mechanisms for response to cyber-incidents, involving government as well as the corporate, academic, and NGO sectors. Some have declared ‘cyber’ as the fifth military domain, and have set up defensive and offensive cyber-commands within their armies.

South-eastern Europe (SEE), and especially the western Balkans, is lagging behind. The online course on cybersecurity aims to increase cybersecurity capacities of public institutions and the private and civil sectors in SEE, through providing policy training aimed in particular at young officials and professionals. Through developing the capacities of individuals, the course aims to drive a shift in public policies and encourage cooperation among countries and stakeholders. This course is organised by DiploFoundation as a new activity within the Cybersecurity Capacity Building and Research Programme for South-Eastern Europe, in cooperation with the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) and with the support of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA of Switzerland.

(Call for application in PDF)

Open for applications: 

No

Application deadline: 
passed for February 2016 course
Start date: 
TBA
Mode(s) of study: 
Certificate
Course details

 

 

 

 

Cyberspace has become an essential component of modern society. Critical societal infrastructure, the financial sector, governmental services, the security sector, schools, and hospitals are increasingly and irreversibly dependent on interconnectivity and the global network. So are citizens.

The merits of the open Internet are accompanied by risks. Such risks need to be approached comprehensively and systematically though the cooperation of all stakeholders. Many countries have adopted national cybersecurity strategies and related legislation, taking into account both security and freedoms. A growing number of countries have set up national mechanisms for response to cyber-incidents, involving government as well as the corporate, academic, and NGO sectors. Some have declared ‘cyber’ as the fifth military domain, and have set up defensive and offensive cyber-commands within their armies.

South-eastern Europe (SEE), and especially the western Balkans, is lagging behind. The online course on cybersecurity aims to increase cybersecurity capacities of public institutions and the private and civil sectors in SEE, through providing policy training aimed in particular at young officials and professionals. Through developing the capacities of individuals, the course aims to drive a shift in public policies and encourage cooperation among countries and stakeholders. This course is organised as a new activity within the Cybersecurity Capacity Building and Research Programme for South-Eastern Europe, in cooperation with the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) and with the support of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA of Switzerland.

 

Learning objectives

By the end of the course, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the defining features of cybersecurity, and the factors which shape the international and regional issues.
  • Identify principal threats to cybersecurity; describe and analyse the key cybersecurity issues for users, and states.
  • Explain the issues involved in cybercrime, its impact and investigation.
  • Describe how the Internet is used for terrorism and ways to address this concern.
  • Explain the threats to the core Internet infrastructure and the core infrastructure of society.
  • Explain the risks of cyber-conflict and map international law and global and regional norms of state behaviour in relation to cyberspace.
  • Outline key national mechanisms for prevention and response to cyber-incidents and explain the working models of the CERT.
  • Map the broader context of cybersecurity, including the link with human rights, privacy and data protection, and economic growth.
  • Explain and analyse the international frameworks for cybersecurity cooperation.

 

Course topics

The online course covers an introduction to cybersecurity and definitions; threats and vulnerabilities; cybercrime challenges and frameworks to combat cybercrime; security of the core Internet infrastructure and critical infrastructure; cyberterrorism, cyber-conflicts, and international law and norms of state behaviour in cyberspace with focus on related international and regional initiatives; national policies and mechanisms such as strategies and CERTs; security sector reforms and cybersecurity; and the broader context of cybersecurity including Internet governance, human rights, privacy and data protection, and economic growth and development.

 

Guest experts

The online course will feature guest lecturing contributions from a number of experts, including:

Gorazd Bozic, Team Manager of the Slovenian CERT (SI-CERT) and Member of the Management Board of ENISA

 

 

 

Aapo Cederberg, Senior Programme Adviser at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP)

 

 

 

Predrag Tasevski, Founder of CyberSecurity.mk and Visiting Professor at University of Donja Gorica

 

 

 

Tatiana Tropina, Senior Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in the Information Law and Legal Informatics Section

 

 

 

Dragan Mladenovic, Lieutenant Colonel, Analyst for Information Security and Cyber Defense at the Department for Telecommunications and IT of the Serbian Armed Forces General Staff

 

Who should apply

This course will be of interest to anyone who seeks to engage in the fields of cybersecurity, cyber-diplomacy, and digital policies, such as:

  • Officials from ministries and authorities in charge of information society, technology, security, foreign affairs, industry and economic development, media, human rights, or education, among others.
  • Diplomats responsible for digital issues or security cooperation.
  • Staff of regional and international organisations whose work is related to the security sector, rights, or digital policies.
  • Representatives of the private sector, especially the ICT industry, such as telecommunication companies and Internet service providers, as well as the financial or energy sector, and other critical sectors.
  • Professionals working with the critical infrastructure operators and cybersecurity bodies (such as CERTs).
  • Educators, graduate students, and researchers interested in multidimensional perspectives on cybersecurity.
  • Professionals and activists from NGOs and civil society working on or interested in cybersecurity.
Prerequisites

To be considered for the course, applicants must:

  • Be from and working in the SEE region: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Turkey. (Applicants from other countries are invited to apply for Diplo’s regular annual online course in cybersecurity – see www.diplomacy.edu/courses/cybersecurity for more details.)
  • Hold an undergraduate university degree and, ideally, at least two years relevant working experience.
  • Have sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and preparing short written texts).
  • Be available to dedicate at least four to six hours per week study time (at whatever time is convenient to the participant - this might be during evenings or weekends) including a weekly one-hour meeting (at a time to be announced), in the period between 22 February and 28 April.

Priority will be given to applicants younger than 35, from the western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia).

Fees

Participation in this course for selected applicants is fully funded by the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA of Switzerland.

How to apply

We are no longer accepting applications for the February 2016 course. Please check back here later in the year for information about the next course session.

You are required to upload two supporting documents with your application:

  • A current CV
  • A motivation letter (maximum one page) indicating:
    • Key details of your relevant professional and educational background, including your personal objectives and plans for the future.
    • Reasons for your interest in this course.
    • Why you feel you should be selected to participate in this course: how your participation will benefit you, your institution and/or your country.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Late applications will be considered only if places remain in the course. In case of enquiries, please contact us at admissions@diplomacy.edu

 
Selection process

Representatives from DiploFoundation and DCAF will select a maximum of 20 participants to attend this course. Priority will be given to applicants younger than 35, from the western Balkans countries (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia). Selected applicants will be notified after the application deadline.

Print course info
Course details:

 

 

 

 

Cyberspace has become an essential component of modern society. Critical societal infrastructure, the financial sector, governmental services, the security sector, schools, and hospitals are increasingly and irreversibly dependent on interconnectivity and the global network. So are citizens.

The merits of the open Internet are accompanied by risks. Such risks need to be approached comprehensively and systematically though the cooperation of all stakeholders. Many countries have adopted national cybersecurity strategies and related legislation, taking into account both security and freedoms. A growing number of countries have set up national mechanisms for response to cyber-incidents, involving government as well as the corporate, academic, and NGO sectors. Some have declared ‘cyber’ as the fifth military domain, and have set up defensive and offensive cyber-commands within their armies.

South-eastern Europe (SEE), and especially the western Balkans, is lagging behind. The online course on cybersecurity aims to increase cybersecurity capacities of public institutions and the private and civil sectors in SEE, through providing policy training aimed in particular at young officials and professionals. Through developing the capacities of individuals, the course aims to drive a shift in public policies and encourage cooperation among countries and stakeholders. This course is organised as a new activity within the Cybersecurity Capacity Building and Research Programme for South-Eastern Europe, in cooperation with the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) and with the support of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA of Switzerland.

 

Learning objectives

By the end of the course, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the defining features of cybersecurity, and the factors which shape the international and regional issues.
  • Identify principal threats to cybersecurity; describe and analyse the key cybersecurity issues for users, and states.
  • Explain the issues involved in cybercrime, its impact and investigation.
  • Describe how the Internet is used for terrorism and ways to address this concern.
  • Explain the threats to the core Internet infrastructure and the core infrastructure of society.
  • Explain the risks of cyber-conflict and map international law and global and regional norms of state behaviour in relation to cyberspace.
  • Outline key national mechanisms for prevention and response to cyber-incidents and explain the working models of the CERT.
  • Map the broader context of cybersecurity, including the link with human rights, privacy and data protection, and economic growth.
  • Explain and analyse the international frameworks for cybersecurity cooperation.

 

Course topics

The online course covers an introduction to cybersecurity and definitions; threats and vulnerabilities; cybercrime challenges and frameworks to combat cybercrime; security of the core Internet infrastructure and critical infrastructure; cyberterrorism, cyber-conflicts, and international law and norms of state behaviour in cyberspace with focus on related international and regional initiatives; national policies and mechanisms such as strategies and CERTs; security sector reforms and cybersecurity; and the broader context of cybersecurity including Internet governance, human rights, privacy and data protection, and economic growth and development.

 

Guest experts

The online course will feature guest lecturing contributions from a number of experts, including:

Gorazd Bozic, Team Manager of the Slovenian CERT (SI-CERT) and Member of the Management Board of ENISA

 

 

 

Aapo Cederberg, Senior Programme Adviser at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP)

 

 

 

Predrag Tasevski, Founder of CyberSecurity.mk and Visiting Professor at University of Donja Gorica

 

 

 

Tatiana Tropina, Senior Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in the Information Law and Legal Informatics Section

 

 

 

Dragan Mladenovic, Lieutenant Colonel, Analyst for Information Security and Cyber Defense at the Department for Telecommunications and IT of the Serbian Armed Forces General Staff

 

Who should apply:

This course will be of interest to anyone who seeks to engage in the fields of cybersecurity, cyber-diplomacy, and digital policies, such as:

  • Officials from ministries and authorities in charge of information society, technology, security, foreign affairs, industry and economic development, media, human rights, or education, among others.
  • Diplomats responsible for digital issues or security cooperation.
  • Staff of regional and international organisations whose work is related to the security sector, rights, or digital policies.
  • Representatives of the private sector, especially the ICT industry, such as telecommunication companies and Internet service providers, as well as the financial or energy sector, and other critical sectors.
  • Professionals working with the critical infrastructure operators and cybersecurity bodies (such as CERTs).
  • Educators, graduate students, and researchers interested in multidimensional perspectives on cybersecurity.
  • Professionals and activists from NGOs and civil society working on or interested in cybersecurity.
Methodology:

This course is conducted online over a period of ten weeks. Reading materials and tools for online interaction are provided through an online classroom. Each week, participants read the provided lecture texts, adding comments, references, and questions in the form of hypertext entries. The lecturers and other participants read and respond to these entries, creating interaction based on the lecture text. During the week, participants complete additional online activities (e.g. quizzes, crossword puzzles, etc.). At the end of the week, participants, lecturers, and guest experts join an online meeting to discuss topics relevant to the week.

Courses are based on a collaborative approach to learning, involving a high level of interaction. This course requires a minimum of four to six hours of study time per week.

Participants are invited to join Diplo’s global Internet governance online community of over 1,400 members, and to attend monthly webinars and other IG-related events and activities.

The course materials, the e-learning platform, and the working language of the course is English. Applicants should consider whether their reading and writing skills in English are sufficient to follow postgraduate level materials and discussion.

Prerequisites:

To be considered for the course, applicants must:

  • Be from and working in the SEE region: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Turkey. (Applicants from other countries are invited to apply for Diplo’s regular annual online course in cybersecurity – see www.diplomacy.edu/courses/cybersecurity for more details.)
  • Hold an undergraduate university degree and, ideally, at least two years relevant working experience.
  • Have sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and preparing short written texts).
  • Be available to dedicate at least four to six hours per week study time (at whatever time is convenient to the participant - this might be during evenings or weekends) including a weekly one-hour meeting (at a time to be announced), in the period between 22 February and 28 April.

Priority will be given to applicants younger than 35, from the western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia).

Fees:

Participation in this course for selected applicants is fully funded by the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA of Switzerland.

How to apply:

We are no longer accepting applications for the February 2016 course. Please check back here later in the year for information about the next course session.

You are required to upload two supporting documents with your application:

  • A current CV
  • A motivation letter (maximum one page) indicating:
    • Key details of your relevant professional and educational background, including your personal objectives and plans for the future.
    • Reasons for your interest in this course.
    • Why you feel you should be selected to participate in this course: how your participation will benefit you, your institution and/or your country.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Late applications will be considered only if places remain in the course. In case of enquiries, please contact us at admissions@diplomacy.edu

 
Selection process

Representatives from DiploFoundation and DCAF will select a maximum of 20 participants to attend this course. Priority will be given to applicants younger than 35, from the western Balkans countries (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo*, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia). Selected applicants will be notified after the application deadline.

Contact admissions

DiploFoundation (attn Tanja Nikolic)

Anutruf, Ground Floor

Hriereb Street

Msida, MSD 1675, Malta

Tel: +356 21 333 323; Fax: +356 21 315 574

admissions@diplomacy.edu

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For Internet Governance courses please contact our IG team on: ig@diplomacy.edu

For Professional Development workshops please contact Sylvana Busuttil on: s.busuttil@diplomacy.edu