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In this chapter, John Pace decribes the three-phase evolution of knowledge management in the human rights program of the United Nations. The realisation that knowledge management is a necessity came during the third phase.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: John Pace, 2002

In his paper, Colin Jennings describes the way Wilton Park – an executive agency of the British FCO – operates. He highlights some of the key reasons for its success, and identifies some specific outcomes of the conferences organised by Wilton Park.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Colin Jennings, 2002

In this paper, Drazen Pehar analyses the argumentation made by George Lakoff of the University of California at Berkeley in his seminal paper  on ‘Metaphor and War’, in which he tried to deconstruct the rhetoric U.S. president George Bush used to justify the war in the Gulf.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Drazen Pehar, 2002

In his paper, J. Thomas Converse focuses on four records-related areas where the issues of knowledge management and diplomacy come together and provide the greatest challenges to archivists, diplomats, historians and technology providers: validation, trustworthiness, context and longevity.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: J. Thomas Converse, 2002

In this chapter, Walter Fust talks about the role of knowledge management, and knowledge for development, in diplomacy. He describes various methods to assess what knowledge should be stocked, and explains the need for managers who are assigned the task of deciding what should be stocked.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Walter Fust, 2002

In his paper, Alex Sceberras Trigona stresses the importance of the diplomatic document as a primary source of diplomatic knowledge, in the light of the distinction between ‘information’ (can be recorded) and knowledge (not easily recorded), the flow of knowledge as information.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Alex Sceberras Trigona, 2002

Ambassador Kishan Rana introduces the dimension of diplomatic signalling.

Source: Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
Author: Kishan Rana, 2001

Professor Dietrich Kappeler provides an overview of the various types of formal written documents used in diplomacy, pointing out where the practices surrounding these documents have changed in recent years.

Source: Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
Author: Dietrich Kappeler, 2001

Of central concern in the field of negotiation is the use of ambiguity to find formulations acceptable to all parties. Professor Norman Scott looks at the contrasting roles of ambiguity and precision in conference diplomacy.

Source: Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
Author: Norman Scott, 2001

Ivan Callus and Ruben Borg apply a very different set of tools to the analysis of diplomatic discourse. Their paper applies the discourse of deconstruction, a form of literary criticism, to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

Source: Language and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija and H. Slavik (2001)
Author: Ivan Callus, Ruben Borg, 2001

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