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author: Alena Korshuk

On intercultural training of diplomats

2004

Today the world is becoming smaller and smaller - distances shrink and become irrelevant, information flows are immense and very fast. People tend to speak foreign languages and, to their surprise, find out that this is not enough. There is more to it, and it is culture. It is of paramount importance to educate a generation of people capable of communicating effectively and working together with representatives of other cultures.

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