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Ginger Paque July 06, 2018

I'm enjoying this series of blogs, and look forward to the next one -- thanks Bi! Two things resonated particularly with me in this one. First, the point: 'Since discussion by assertion tends to advance the interests of those who shout loudest' screamed 'tweeting in caps' at me. It amazes me that this so-transparent technique can work. I put it down to the gut-appeal, or rather gut-effect -- because how can that be appealing? -- mentioned in the hasty generalisation blog. The second was the apparent inclusion by exclusion (of opposing views) and the dangers of choosing whom to include (or not) in our choice of minorities that seems prevalent today. Perhaps after this series explaining the traditional fallacies in current debate, you could do a series teaching us how to refute them in discussions, and overcome them in ourselves :)
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Biljana (not verified) July 14, 2018

So glad for your feedback and encouragement, thanks Ginger! Regarding tweets, here is an article that looks at the YELL factor, Trump's use of all-caps, and how capitalisation is (and has been) used for different purposes: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/02/10/how-all-caps-came-to-signify-shouting-as-in-trumps-see-you-in-court/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.fb5fa0968d55 Regarding how to handle fallacies in debate, I'd love to rise to your challenge - maybe we could do it together! Since heightened awareness is the name of the game, I'll carry on trying to shed light on the inevitability, and even the occasional desirability, of logical fallacies. Suggestions for topics are welcome!

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