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By on 04 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools

WHY?

The first assumption is that once you have located useful information on the Internet, you will probably want to note the address (URL) of the information for easy future access.

One simple way to do this is with bookmarking. The second assumption is that diplomats often work on many different PC (Office PC, Home PC, Laptop, etc...) and therefore have different bookmarks on every computer. The bookmarks are generally (or should be) a very selected list of websites which are essential for the daily work of the user.

By on 03 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools

WHY?
In  many occasions diplomats need to organize or to be organized. Sometimes this activity refers to practical events (Conference, Meeting, Visit. etc.), sometime it refers to concepts or ideas (Reports, Speeches, Analysis, etc.).

In both cases a technique such as Mind mapping can be very helpful in order to structure (either the activities or the thoughts) and to plan.

By on 03 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools

WHY?
Frequent communications are essential in the diplomatic world. International phone calls are the norm in diplomatic network. The 'Voice over IP' (VoIP) services offer interesting opportunities and can allow important savings through low cost calls.

By on 02 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools

WHY?
The normal tool of ordinary and simple searches has now become, also for diplomats, the Internet. In particular the different search engines available (such as Google).

By on 02 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

Usually e-participation is closely linked to e-government and e-governance, referring to any Information and Communication Technology (especially Internet) resources used to involve citizens in government processes.

This may be as simple as making a passport application or paying your taxes online, or involve an e-petition, remote participation in a meeting or conference, or a Twitter or other Web 2.0 advocacy campaign.

What are the advantages?

By on 02 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy, E-Learning

E-diplomacy requires new skills, and in some cases, a new approach to diplomacy. Diplomats are already re-thinking the way they work, taking a new look at traditional activities such as negotiation and representation. New activities, such as addressing policy communities via the Internet, call for specific skills. (Re)training is essential! Here we will discuss approaches and methods of training in e-diplomacy. Please add your ideas! You can share links about courses that cover e-learning,  suggestions on organizing this training, essential topics, and more.

By on 02 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools
WHY?
Diplomats are confronted every day with a vast amount of information to consult. Most of this information is available and consulted online. 

Diplomats have more information at their disposal now that they have ever had, but it doesn't mean that they know what it the optimal way (if there is one) to access that information efficiently.
In particular it is very important to be timely informed and  to be able to follow last developments of events.

By on 02 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-tools

Video-conferencing was a big hype in the 1990s when it was promoted as a way to replace traditional meetings. As with much hype, it was followed by a "disillusionment" phase.

People simply preferred traditional meetings. In the meantime, video gradually entered into international conference rooms and meetings. Today, it is normal to have the keynote address delivered via video. Here is an example of one of fathers of the Internet, Vint Cerf, addressing the 4th Annual Meeting of the Internet Governance Forum in Sharm El Sheikh, 2009 (video by Seiiti Arata).

By on 01 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

A good way to start exploring the field of e-diplomacy is to discuss the correlation between this theme and the theory of international relations. In this video, Joseph Nye explains how public diplomacy currently relies on "soft power", or convincing others to “want what you want”, instead of making others “do what you want” by using traditional "hard power" techniques, such as military resources.

By on 01 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

How can diplomats make use of technology to improve their professional skills and communication? How do computer mediated communications affect diplomatic discourse?

What is the impact of a globalized and interactive media such as the Internet on public diplomacy? These are some of issues that will be discussed on this blog.

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