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By on 24 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

Consular departments take advantage of several e-tools to keep in touch with nationals overseas. Here are three recent trends in using e-tools for consular assistance and protection. (Links point to examples on the web)

Call centres: 24/7 call centres operate from the capital to respond to calls from nationals overseas during emergencies. Nationals are also encouraged to register online with the foreign ministry or the nearest mission. (See Australian DFAT’s Smartraveller website)

By on 22 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

An experience recently reported by the NY Times shows what an interactive public diplomacy strategy should be about. Cultural diplomacy has been used as part of US strategy for public diplomacy in a project sponsored by the State Department called DanceMotion USA.

By on 22 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

The involvement of the media in Public Diplomacy may take different shapes. One of them is known as diplomacy in the media. It happens when a State uses mass media channels to establish communication with other State as a way to move forward negotiations or gather support for agreements. It differs from regular public diplomacy strategies, because the aim of diplomacy in the media is not to subtly support the view of the world or the propaganda given State, but to directly send a message to the other party.

By on 16 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

E-participation takes many forms, some in amazing quantities of transactions adding ease and speed to citizen and other services. That is quantity well-acheived through technology.

By on 16 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

Enforcing visa regimes may not strictly fall under the mandate of the MFA. Nor is it a service directly provided to one's own nationals. However, it is one of the most popular functions routinely performed in embassies and consulates.

By on 12 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

A link between e-participation (web) and foreign policy--that is significant! See Stephen Hale's Blog "The Web as a Foreign Policy Issue", which opines that one area of E-diplomacy is to examine how we can use the power and impact of the web to enhance diplomacy. Shane Dillon says that "it is of equal importance to examine how we define the web as a foreign policy issue in its own right".

By on 12 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

Consular work, or the ‘Cinderella Service’, has traditionally been a relatively neglected area in most foreign ministries.

Recent trends have however reshaped the way foreign ministries think about this function which is sometimes considered mundane and routine. The new interest in consular issues is largely attributed to increased international travel, migration and integration in an increasingly borderless world.

By on 12 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

The E-consulate blog will examine the use of the Internet in consular affairs. We will use the term 'e-consulate' to define consular services provided to citizens overseas using the Internet. For this topic, we will look at three sets of closely interrelated questions in light of e-diplomacy.

The first set of questions revolves around a definition of e-consulates, the second set of questions looks at efficiently delivering consular services under e-governance measures, and the third relates to how e-participation changes the dynamics of consular matters.

By on 10 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

On Wednesday, March 3, an interesting event was organized during the visit of theSecretary of StateHillary Clinton in Brazil. Significantly, it was called townterview – a mix between the ideas of “closeness” and participation embodied in town meetings with the press conferences organized for the traditional media channels. The event provides some interesting points for the debate about the current US public diplomacy strategy.

By on 10 Mar, 2010 | From the channel/s: E-Diplomacy

A new age of online data has arrived – a fact noted by The Economist in a recent front page feature on “The data deluge”.

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