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'My GoLoard Palmerston - 'My good, this is the end of diplomacy'd, this is the end of diplomacy!' - Reported reaction of Lord Palmerston, British Prime Minister and Foreign Secretary, on receiving the first telegraph message in the 1850s

The Internet and new information and communications technologies (ICTs) have impacted diplomacy on an exponential scale. New technologies are now tools for the practice of diplomacy; topics part of international policymakers’ agendas; and variables influencing the environment of diplomacy. In this space, pointing you to a wealth of resources, we explore diplomacy in the digital age by focusing on how diplomats use e-tools (digital diplomacy); how the development of new technologies and their implications are discussed as part of the diplomatic agenda (governance of the Internet); and, how new technologies have redefined international co-operation and interdependence (digital co-operation).

We invite you to join our online training and to get in touch with our digital diplomacy team for any queries.

Digital, cyber, tech, net, virtual, or e-diplomacy?

The use of prefixes like cyber, digital, tech, net, and e- have created a lot of confusion. Despite the fact that they are used interchangeably, there is no common understanding of their exact meaning. While we can agree that all prefixes describe an impact of the Internet on diplomacy, there is much less understanding about the extent of these impacts.

Read also: Emerging Language of Internet Diplomacy

Etymology

Each prefix describes various Internet developments. The etymology of ‘cyber’ goes back to the ancient Greek meaning of ‘governing’. Cyber came to our time via Norbert Weiner’s book 'Cybernetics' and William Gibson’s science-fiction novel 'Neuromancer'. The growth in the use of the prefix ‘cyber’ followed the growth of the Internet. Today, cyber mainly refers to security issues; e- is the preferred prefix for economic issues, digital is mostly used by the government sector, while virtual has been practically abandoned.

E’ is the abbreviation for ‘electronic’. It got its first use through e-commerce, as a description of the early commercialisation of the Internet. In the EU’s Lisbon Agenda (2000) and the WSIS declarations (Geneva 2003; Tunis 2005), e- was the most frequently used prefix. The WSIS follow-up implementation is centred on action lines including e-government, e-business, e-learning, e-health, e-employment, e-agriculture, and e-science. Nonetheless, e- is not as present as it used to be. Even the EU recently abandoned e-, trying, most likely, to distance itself from the failure of its Lisbon Agenda.

Digital refers to ‘1’ and ‘0’ – two digits which are the basis of the whole Internet world. In the past, digital was used mainly in development circles to represent the digital divide. During the last few years, digital has started conquering the Internet linguistic space, especially in the language and strategy of the European Union. Virtual relates to the intangible nature of the Internet.

Virtual reality could be both an intangible reality, (something that cannot be touched) and a reality that does not exist (a false reality). Academics and Internet pioneers used virtual to highlight the novelty of the Internet, and the emergence of ‘a brave new world’. Virtual, because of its ambiguous meaning, rarely appears in policy language and international documents.

In this space, digital diplomacy and e-diplomacy are used interchangeably.

(Source: An Introduction to Internet Governance, Dr Jovan Kurbalija | DiploFoundation, 7th edition. Read also: Different prefixes, same meaning: cyber, digital, net, online, virtual, e-)

Diplomacy in the digital age



Diplomacy in the digital age refers to new methods and modes of conducting diplomacy with the help of the Internet and ICTs and describes their impact on contemporary diplomatic practices. Technology impacts diplomacy and the way it is practiced in a number of ways, identifying new actors, tools and processes of diplomacy and international relations. Related terms include cyber diplomacy, mainly related to security issues; tech and science diplomacy, related to the modes of states’ interactions in innovation hubs; data diplomacy, related to the use and impact of big data on diplomacy and international affairs; e-diplomacy, related to economic issues; and, net diplomacy.

Cumulatively, the Internet is having a profound effect on the two cornerstones of diplomacy: information and communication. Diplo's taxonomy looks at three aspects of the interplay between Internet and diplomacy: Internet driven-changes in the environment in which diplomacy is conducted (geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence); the emergence of new topics on diplomatic agendas (Internet governance, cybersecurity, privacy, and more); and the use of new Internet tools in the practice of diplomacy (social media, big data, and more). The taxonomy goes beyond the typically narrow focus on social media and public diplomacy in contemporary literature on digital diplomacy to cover the overall interplay between Internet and diplomacy.

We invite you to join our online training on E-Diplomacy, 21st Century Diplomacy, Economic Diplomacy, Digital Commerce, and Language and Diplomacy. For Diplo’s full course catalogue, visit the dedicated webpage.

 

Featured: Our report on the potential of big data for diplomacy

In February 2018, DiploFoundation launched the report Data Diplomacy: Updating diplomacy to the big data era, commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland. The report maps the main opportunities of big data in different areas of diplomacy, proposing ways for ministries of foreign affairs to capture its potential, and describes the key considerations to take into account for big data to flourish. Read the press release, the full report, and the executive summary. Read the press release, the full report, and the executive summary.

Diplomacy in the digital age refers to new methods and modes of conducting diplomacy with the help of the Internet and ICTs and describes their impact on contemporary diplomatic practices. Technology impacts diplomacy and the way it is practiced in a number of ways, identifying new actors, tools and processes of diplomacy and international relations. Related terms include cyber diplomacy, mainly related to security issues; tech and science diplomacy, related to the modes of states’ interactions in innovation hubs; data diplomacy, related to the use and impact of big data on diplomacy and international affairs; e-diplomacy, related to economic issues; and, net diplomacy.

Cumulatively, the Internet is having a profound effect on the two cornerstones of diplomacy: information and communication. Diplo's taxonomy looks at three aspects of the interplay between Internet and diplomacy: Internet driven-changes in the environment in which diplomacy is conducted (geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence); the emergence of new topics on diplomatic agendas (Internet governance, cybersecurity, privacy, and more); and the use of new Internet tools in the practice of diplomacy (social media, big data, and more). The taxonomy goes beyond the typically narrow focus on social media and public diplomacy in contemporary literature on digital diplomacy to cover the overall interplay between Internet and diplomacy.

We invite you to join our online training on E-Diplomacy, 21st Century Diplomacy, Economic Diplomacy, Digital Commerce, and Language and Diplomacy. For Diplo’s full course catalogue, visit the dedicated webpage.

 

Featured: Our report on the potential of big data for diplomacy

In February 2018, DiploFoundation launched the report Data Diplomacy: Updating diplomacy to the big data era, commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland. The report maps the main opportunities of big data in different areas of diplomacy, proposing ways for ministries of foreign affairs to capture its potential, and describes the key considerations to take into account for big data to flourish. Read the press release, the full report, and the executive summary. Read the press release, the full report, and the executive summary.

Digital as a tool for diplomacy



The Internet has become central to public and private communication while contemporary tools, including social media, have brought millions into open, peer-to-peer conversation spaces. This provides both enormous opportunities and challenges for states and international organisations as they seek to engage with new policy spaces developing around the Internet. States and international organisations require a new set of skills, organisational changes, and innovative ways of approaching global policy.

E-participation

Online participation is a set of resources that allows for increased openness and inclusiveness, particularly in global policy processes. 

The first online participation session in multilateral diplomacy was held by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in 1963; since then, the availability of the Internet in conference rooms has made remote participation a reality for more inclusive and open international negotiations. An increased number of stakeholders, from civil society to business representatives, can indeed participate (and not only passively follow the deliberations) in the discussions without physically being present in the room.

Equal participation between online and offline participants should be ensured through planning, meeting strategies, appropriate panel organisation, and trained panel moderators aware of e-participants.

Online participation was first enhanced during the 2007 Internet Governance Forum (IGF) with the aim to include the possibility for remote participants to ask questions and contribute to discussions. Since 2009, remote participation at IGF meetings has been further enhanced through the introduction of remote hubs. The 2019 IGF saw the availability of 55 remote hubs.

What is required from the moderator of an online discussion and optimal remote moderation in order to achieve meaningful participation? Diplo offers complete support for conceptualising and deploying e-participation in international meetings. This includes strategic planning for remote hubs and workshops; guidelines for meeting organisers; integration of social media tools; and, training of moderators.

Read also: Remote is far, far way: Online is inclusive collaboration

E-tools in digital diplomacy

The Internet has become central to public and private communication while contemporary tools, including social media, have brought millions into open, peer-to-peer conversation spaces. This provides enormous opportunities and challenges for states and international organisations as they seek to engage with new policy spaces developing around the Internet.

The concept of social networks needs no introduction, since they are now part of our everyday lives. Twitter and Facebook are currently the most popular e-tools used by foreign ministries around the world. These two networks are particularly good examples of integrated platforms, because they can be linked to one another, driving traffic from one platform to the other.

Twitter allows the user to sound the opinions of the community on various issues, engage in discussions with others to present and explain own positions, and identify articles and readings on particular topics of interest (through following posts tagged with #hashtags, for example #ediplomacy). Italian diplomat Andreas Sandre’s Twitter for Diplomats (2013) is a very useful resource on Twitter specific to this professional field.

Previously used mainly to connect with friends and share updates (statements, feelings, photos, event invitations, music, interesting readings, links, etc.), Facebook is increasingly used for professional outreach as well. By creating institutional or public personal profiles, pages, interest groups, or events, an organisation can gather a community interested in their work, curate content, and engage efficiently with the community and the public.

Other platforms include YouTube, FlickR, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. While the above refers to social media, there are then other e-tools which are important for public diplomacy. These include blogs, which are immensely popular, and wikis, which are nowadays more frequently used for internal purposes, such as knowledge management.

The infographic summarises current findings related to foreign ministries from DiploFoundation’s ongoing study of e-diplomacy trends, and reveals interesting tendencies.

 

The 5 core e-competences

The specific value of e-tools lies in a set of core skills - the 5 Core e-Competences (5Cs) - which diplomats need to harness:

  1. Curate: Listening is the first step. It is done by curating information and knowledge.
  2. Collaborate: While you curate, you gradually start collaborating both within your organisation and with outside communities. You start developing your community by sharing resources, asking questions, etc.
  3. Communicate: It is time to start communicating. This skill represents the ability and knowledge to extend your outreach and visibility.
  4. Create: After curating, collaborating, and communicating, you are much more comfortable in social media. You have a solid following. It is time to focus more on creating your online content.
  5. Critique: By now you should have gained more social visibility. This also exposes you to more critical comments and discussion. You need to engage in critical discussions and learn how to manage criticism.

In the context of digital diplomacy, these competencies represent the skills and knowledge needed by professionals to optimally perform in the digital world. Nevertheless, developing competencies in digital diplomacy requires time. Effective social media campaigns are also based on these core skills. Nevertheless, developing competencies in digital diplomacy requires time. On social media, we estimate that a practitioner requires:

  • One day to get acquainted with the e-tools for digital diplomacy
  • One month to become a good e-listener, and to actively follow the core resources
  • One year to become an active e-diplomat, i.e, to contribute and develop a stable following The timeframes are not necessarily literal but are meant to demonstrate the ratio and proportion of time needed for the e-diplomat to acquire and employ the core e-competences.

Learn more about this on Diplo’s E-Diplomacy course.

Geneva Engage

The Geneva Engage is an initiative of the Geneva Internet Platform, supported by the Republic and State of Geneva, and DiploFoundation meant to award the most engagement  and outreach use of social media by international organisations, non-governmental and non-profit organisations, and permanent representations to the United Nations Office in Geneva.

Learn more about the data analysis carried out by Diplo’s Data Team and the winners of the 4th Geneva Engage Award. The 5th Geneva Engage Award will take place on 29 January 2020.

Geneva Engage Awards 2019

Read also: 2020: The year of online participation

 

The Internet has become central to public and private communication while contemporary tools, including social media, have brought millions into open, peer-to-peer conversation spaces. This provides both enormous opportunities and challenges for states and international organisations as they seek to engage with new policy spaces developing around the Internet. States and international organisations require a new set of skills, organisational changes, and innovative ways of approaching global policy.

E-participation

Online participation is a set of resources that allows for increased openness and inclusiveness, particularly in global policy processes. 

The first online participation session in multilateral diplomacy was held by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in 1963; since then, the availability of the Internet in conference rooms has made remote participation a reality for more inclusive and open international negotiations. An increased number of stakeholders, from civil society to business representatives, can indeed participate (and not only passively follow the deliberations) in the discussions without physically being present in the room.

Equal participation between online and offline participants should be ensured through planning, meeting strategies, appropriate panel organisation, and trained panel moderators aware of e-participants.

Online participation was first enhanced during the 2007 Internet Governance Forum (IGF) with the aim to include the possibility for remote participants to ask questions and contribute to discussions. Since 2009, remote participation at IGF meetings has been further enhanced through the introduction of remote hubs. The 2019 IGF saw the availability of 55 remote hubs.

What is required from the moderator of an online discussion and optimal remote moderation in order to achieve meaningful participation? Diplo offers complete support for conceptualising and deploying e-participation in international meetings. This includes strategic planning for remote hubs and workshops; guidelines for meeting organisers; integration of social media tools; and, training of moderators.

Read also: Remote is far, far way: Online is inclusive collaboration

E-tools in digital diplomacy

The Internet has become central to public and private communication while contemporary tools, including social media, have brought millions into open, peer-to-peer conversation spaces. This provides enormous opportunities and challenges for states and international organisations as they seek to engage with new policy spaces developing around the Internet.

The concept of social networks needs no introduction, since they are now part of our everyday lives. Twitter and Facebook are currently the most popular e-tools used by foreign ministries around the world. These two networks are particularly good examples of integrated platforms, because they can be linked to one another, driving traffic from one platform to the other.

Twitter allows the user to sound the opinions of the community on various issues, engage in discussions with others to present and explain own positions, and identify articles and readings on particular topics of interest (through following posts tagged with #hashtags, for example #ediplomacy). Italian diplomat Andreas Sandre’s Twitter for Diplomats (2013) is a very useful resource on Twitter specific to this professional field.

Previously used mainly to connect with friends and share updates (statements, feelings, photos, event invitations, music, interesting readings, links, etc.), Facebook is increasingly used for professional outreach as well. By creating institutional or public personal profiles, pages, interest groups, or events, an organisation can gather a community interested in their work, curate content, and engage efficiently with the community and the public.

Other platforms include YouTube, FlickR, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. While the above refers to social media, there are then other e-tools which are important for public diplomacy. These include blogs, which are immensely popular, and wikis, which are nowadays more frequently used for internal purposes, such as knowledge management.

The infographic summarises current findings related to foreign ministries from DiploFoundation’s ongoing study of e-diplomacy trends, and reveals interesting tendencies.

 

The 5 core e-competences

The specific value of e-tools lies in a set of core skills - the 5 Core e-Competences (5Cs) - which diplomats need to harness:

  1. Curate: Listening is the first step. It is done by curating information and knowledge.
  2. Collaborate: While you curate, you gradually start collaborating both within your organisation and with outside communities. You start developing your community by sharing resources, asking questions, etc.
  3. Communicate: It is time to start communicating. This skill represents the ability and knowledge to extend your outreach and visibility.
  4. Create: After curating, collaborating, and communicating, you are much more comfortable in social media. You have a solid following. It is time to focus more on creating your online content.
  5. Critique: By now you should have gained more social visibility. This also exposes you to more critical comments and discussion. You need to engage in critical discussions and learn how to manage criticism.

In the context of digital diplomacy, these competencies represent the skills and knowledge needed by professionals to optimally perform in the digital world. Nevertheless, developing competencies in digital diplomacy requires time. Effective social media campaigns are also based on these core skills. Nevertheless, developing competencies in digital diplomacy requires time. On social media, we estimate that a practitioner requires:

  • One day to get acquainted with the e-tools for digital diplomacy
  • One month to become a good e-listener, and to actively follow the core resources
  • One year to become an active e-diplomat, i.e, to contribute and develop a stable following The timeframes are not necessarily literal but are meant to demonstrate the ratio and proportion of time needed for the e-diplomat to acquire and employ the core e-competences.

Learn more about this on Diplo’s E-Diplomacy course.

Geneva Engage

The Geneva Engage is an initiative of the Geneva Internet Platform, supported by the Republic and State of Geneva, and DiploFoundation meant to award the most engagement  and outreach use of social media by international organisations, non-governmental and non-profit organisations, and permanent representations to the United Nations Office in Geneva.

Learn more about the data analysis carried out by Diplo’s Data Team and the winners of the 4th Geneva Engage Award. The 5th Geneva Engage Award will take place on 29 January 2020.

Geneva Engage Awards 2019

Read also: 2020: The year of online participation

 

Digital as a topic for diplomacy



The impact of the Internet and new technologies have not only represented a tool for new diplomatic means of engagement, but new technologies and technological breakthroughs have also added new topics in diplomacy. Issues such as privacy, cybersecurity, human rights online, and data governance are now part of international agendas discussed in different fora and processes.

Internet Governance identifies a variety of topics touching on different existing fields and categorisations. Diplo’s classification of Internet governance groups the main 40–50 issues into the following five baskets:

  • Infrastructure and standardisation
  • Legal
  • Economic Development
  • Sociocultural

The classification reflects policy approaches undertaken by the World Summit on the Information Society and the Internet Governance Forum, as well as academic research in this field.

Get the latest updates on more than 50 Internet governance issues, and processes; view upcoming events; and, learn more about the stakeholders active in each digital policy field on the GIP Digital Watch Observatory.

 

What does Internet Governance mean?

Internet Governance identifies a contested concept. The controversy indeed starts with its definition. Defining the Internet means reflecting translating into definitions different perspectives, approaches, and policy interests.

Typically, telecommunication specialists see Internet governance through the prism of the development of a technical infrastructure. Computer specialists focus on the development of different standards and applications, such as XML (eXtensible Markup Language) or Java. Communication specialists stress the facilitation of communication. Human rights activists view Internet governance from the perspective of freedom of expression, privacy, and other basic human rights. Lawyers concentrate on jurisdiction and dispute resolution. Politicians worldwide usually focus on issues that resonate with their electorates, such as techno-optimism (more computers = more education) and threats (Internet security, child protection). Diplomats are mainly concerned with the process and protection of national interests. The list of potentially conflicting professional perspectives of Internet governance goes on.

Learn more about Internet governance with Diplo’s Introduction to Internet Governance course.

(Source: An Introduction to Internet Governance, Dr Jovan Kurbalija | DiploFoundation, 7th edition.)

Featured: The ten most dominant issues at IGF 2019

Using automated text analysis software, Diplo’s Data Team analysed the raw transcripts from 165 sessions captured from real-time captioning. These were then processed using a custom digital policy dictionary.

The results of this analysis show that the most prominent issues at this year’s IGF were trustethics, and interdisciplinary approaches, followed by data governance and sustainable development. Aside from tackling AI as a technological development, recent months have seen the world more concerned about ethical and trust issues, with questions such as: How can trust be restored in technology? How will AI shape the future of humanity? (Watch our video interviews with key experts.)

Compared to 2017 and 2018, there was a slight increase in the number of sessions dedicated to artificial intelligence (AI). This pushed AI to the sixth place on the list, after network security and capacity development.

Learn more from the GIP’s reporting activities from the 14th IGF.

20+ years of e-diplomacy

Back in 1992, there were two early e-diplomacy developments. At the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, civil society activists used e-mail and mailing lists for the first time to co-ordinate their position in lobbying and negotiations. At the same time, in Malta, the first Unit for Computer Applications in Diplomacy was established at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies. The Unit later evolved into DiploFoundation, which, over the last 20+ years has conducted research and trained thousands of diplomats on the way how computers and the Internet impact diplomacy.

A quick summary of 20+ years of e-diplomacy would include the introduction of e-mail, the use of websites by diplomatic services and international organisations, the arrival of computers in conference rooms -  with the introduction of notebooks and wi-fi and, most recently, intensive use of social media such as blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. The introduction of each new e-tool challenged the way things were done traditionally and opened new opportunities for diplomats and diplomacy.

In 2010, Diplo launched the 2010 E-diplomacy Initiative, consisting of awareness building/launch events in the main diplomatic centres, and an International Conference on E-diplomacy (Malta, 3-4 June 2010). The initiative created momentum for courses, research, and community discussion on e-diplomacy. Many of the issues discussed during the events and conference (social media, security, openness vs discretion in diplomacy) became quite topical during the public discussions on WikiLeaks and diplomacy. 

The impact of the Internet and new technologies have not only represented a tool for new diplomatic means of engagement, but new technologies and technological breakthroughs have also added new topics in diplomacy. Issues such as privacy, cybersecurity, human rights online, and data governance are now part of international agendas discussed in different fora and processes.

Internet Governance identifies a variety of topics touching on different existing fields and categorisations. Diplo’s classification of Internet governance groups the main 40–50 issues into the following five baskets:

  • Infrastructure and standardisation
  • Legal
  • Economic Development
  • Sociocultural

The classification reflects policy approaches undertaken by the World Summit on the Information Society and the Internet Governance Forum, as well as academic research in this field.

Get the latest updates on more than 50 Internet governance issues, and processes; view upcoming events; and, learn more about the stakeholders active in each digital policy field on the GIP Digital Watch Observatory.

 

What does Internet Governance mean?

Internet Governance identifies a contested concept. The controversy indeed starts with its definition. Defining the Internet means reflecting translating into definitions different perspectives, approaches, and policy interests.

Typically, telecommunication specialists see Internet governance through the prism of the development of a technical infrastructure. Computer specialists focus on the development of different standards and applications, such as XML (eXtensible Markup Language) or Java. Communication specialists stress the facilitation of communication. Human rights activists view Internet governance from the perspective of freedom of expression, privacy, and other basic human rights. Lawyers concentrate on jurisdiction and dispute resolution. Politicians worldwide usually focus on issues that resonate with their electorates, such as techno-optimism (more computers = more education) and threats (Internet security, child protection). Diplomats are mainly concerned with the process and protection of national interests. The list of potentially conflicting professional perspectives of Internet governance goes on.

Learn more about Internet governance with Diplo’s Introduction to Internet Governance course.

(Source: An Introduction to Internet Governance, Dr Jovan Kurbalija | DiploFoundation, 7th edition.)

Featured: The ten most dominant issues at IGF 2019

Using automated text analysis software, Diplo’s Data Team analysed the raw transcripts from 165 sessions captured from real-time captioning. These were then processed using a custom digital policy dictionary.

The results of this analysis show that the most prominent issues at this year’s IGF were trustethics, and interdisciplinary approaches, followed by data governance and sustainable development. Aside from tackling AI as a technological development, recent months have seen the world more concerned about ethical and trust issues, with questions such as: How can trust be restored in technology? How will AI shape the future of humanity? (Watch our video interviews with key experts.)

Compared to 2017 and 2018, there was a slight increase in the number of sessions dedicated to artificial intelligence (AI). This pushed AI to the sixth place on the list, after network security and capacity development.

Learn more from the GIP’s reporting activities from the 14th IGF.

20+ years of e-diplomacy

Back in 1992, there were two early e-diplomacy developments. At the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, civil society activists used e-mail and mailing lists for the first time to co-ordinate their position in lobbying and negotiations. At the same time, in Malta, the first Unit for Computer Applications in Diplomacy was established at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies. The Unit later evolved into DiploFoundation, which, over the last 20+ years has conducted research and trained thousands of diplomats on the way how computers and the Internet impact diplomacy.

A quick summary of 20+ years of e-diplomacy would include the introduction of e-mail, the use of websites by diplomatic services and international organisations, the arrival of computers in conference rooms -  with the introduction of notebooks and wi-fi and, most recently, intensive use of social media such as blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. The introduction of each new e-tool challenged the way things were done traditionally and opened new opportunities for diplomats and diplomacy.

In 2010, Diplo launched the 2010 E-diplomacy Initiative, consisting of awareness building/launch events in the main diplomatic centres, and an International Conference on E-diplomacy (Malta, 3-4 June 2010). The initiative created momentum for courses, research, and community discussion on e-diplomacy. Many of the issues discussed during the events and conference (social media, security, openness vs discretion in diplomacy) became quite topical during the public discussions on WikiLeaks and diplomacy. 

Digital as a driving-change in diplomacy



The Internet and the changes have also altered the environment in which diplomacy is conducted as well as they question established notions of geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence.

The Internet and its driven-changes have also altered the environment in which diplomacy is conducted as well as they question established notions of geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence. Digital as a driving-change in diplomacy is also shown by the UN Secretary-General High-level Panel on Digital Cooperation, which was convened to advance global multi-stakeholder dialogue on how to work better together to realize the potential of digital technologies for advancing human well-being while mitigating the risks.

The HLPDC final report ‘The Age of Digital Interdependence’ makes 5 sets of recommendations: build an inclusive digital economy and society; develop human and institutional capacity; protect human rights and human agency; promote digital trust, security and stability; and foster global digital cooperation.

One of the key recommendations on digital governance outlines three proposed models for digital governance: Co-governance, IGF Plus, and Digital Commons.

Read about the HLPDC implementation discussions from our reports from the 2019 European Dialogue on Internet Governance and Internet Governance Forum.

Featured: Unpacking the High-Level Panel’s Report on Digital Cooperation: Geneva policy experts propose action plan

One of the main mandates of the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, launched in July 2018, was to recommend improvements to the current digital policy architecture.

The Panel’s report, which was launched in New York on 10 June, and in Geneva on 17 June, has now identified existing gaps and proposed three models and respective functions (read our summary of the Panel’s recommendations).

The need for agility in digital co-operation is clear. With such a diverse landscape of mechanisms, the report invites digital policy actors to discuss how the recommendations and models can be implemented in the coming months. International Geneva can contribute substantially to the report’s implementation.

The Geneva Internet Platform, the Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the UN, and the State of Geneva, together with other partners, organized an expert discussion on Monday, 24th June, 2019 which kick-started the global discussion on the recommendations made by the Panel. Read the event report, including participants' recommendations here.

The Internet and the changes have also altered the environment in which diplomacy is conducted as well as they question established notions of geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence.

The Internet and its driven-changes have also altered the environment in which diplomacy is conducted as well as they question established notions of geo-politics, geo-economics, sovereignty, interdependence. Digital as a driving-change in diplomacy is also shown by the UN Secretary-General High-level Panel on Digital Cooperation, which was convened to advance global multi-stakeholder dialogue on how to work better together to realize the potential of digital technologies for advancing human well-being while mitigating the risks.

The HLPDC final report ‘The Age of Digital Interdependence’ makes 5 sets of recommendations: build an inclusive digital economy and society; develop human and institutional capacity; protect human rights and human agency; promote digital trust, security and stability; and foster global digital cooperation.

One of the key recommendations on digital governance outlines three proposed models for digital governance: Co-governance, IGF Plus, and Digital Commons.

Read about the HLPDC implementation discussions from our reports from the 2019 European Dialogue on Internet Governance and Internet Governance Forum.

Featured: Unpacking the High-Level Panel’s Report on Digital Cooperation: Geneva policy experts propose action plan

One of the main mandates of the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, launched in July 2018, was to recommend improvements to the current digital policy architecture.

The Panel’s report, which was launched in New York on 10 June, and in Geneva on 17 June, has now identified existing gaps and proposed three models and respective functions (read our summary of the Panel’s recommendations).

The need for agility in digital co-operation is clear. With such a diverse landscape of mechanisms, the report invites digital policy actors to discuss how the recommendations and models can be implemented in the coming months. International Geneva can contribute substantially to the report’s implementation.

The Geneva Internet Platform, the Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the UN, and the State of Geneva, together with other partners, organized an expert discussion on Monday, 24th June, 2019 which kick-started the global discussion on the recommendations made by the Panel. Read the event report, including participants' recommendations here.

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Digital diplomacy in Asia-Europe relationsDigital diplomacy in Asia-Europe relations

Asia and Europe account for more than two billion Internet users, which translates into two-thirds of the global user base. From Harmonising Cyberpolicies to Promoting Twiplomacy: How Diplomacy Can Strengthen Asia-Europe’s Digital Connectivity, written by Dr Jovan Kurbalija for the ASEF Outlook Report 2016/2017, analyses the digital connectivity between Asia and Europe from a diplomatic perspective.

 

Digital diplomacy in Asia-Europe relationsDigital diplomacy in Asia-Europe relations

Asia and Europe account for more than two billion Internet users, which translates into two-thirds of the global user base. From Harmonising Cyberpolicies to Promoting Twiplomacy: How Diplomacy Can Strengthen Asia-Europe’s Digital Connectivity, written by Dr Jovan Kurbalija for the ASEF Outlook Report 2016/2017, analyses the digital connectivity between Asia and Europe from a diplomatic perspective.

 

The E-diplomacy series



The E-diplomacy series of illustrations - a concept of the Digital Diplomacy team, designed by Diplo's CreativeLab - highlights the impact of e-diplomacy on various diplomatic functions. The Internet has affected the way we curate information, the tools we use to communicate, the speed at which we communicate, and the formality of communications - among many other aspects. View our gallery for more.

 

Digital Diplomat in actionDigital diplomat in actionDigital and traditional diplomacies

 

 

 

 

 

The E-diplomacy series of illustrations - a concept of the Digital Diplomacy team, designed by Diplo's CreativeLab - highlights the impact of e-diplomacy on various diplomatic functions. The Internet has affected the way we curate information, the tools we use to communicate, the speed at which we communicate, and the formality of communications - among many other aspects. View our gallery for more.

 

Digital Diplomat in actionDigital diplomat in actionDigital and traditional diplomacies

 

 

 

 

 

Meet also our e-diplomat, Ana Gabel, an environment diplomat. Ana represents the modern e-diplomat, and uses e-tools for an agile approach to her work at the ministry. Ana comes alive in Diplo's A Day in the Life of an E-diplomat series, which illustrate how diplomacy can be improved through the use of modern tools and approaches.

 

Comic - Quick Diplomatic ResponseQuick Diplomatic Response

Ana is sent to an urgent emergency team meeting to deal with an oil spill in the region. Fast action and efficient management are necessary to minimise environmental change. Read the story; the illustrations are also available on our gallery.

One day in life of e-diplomatKnowledge Management in Action

Ana's work involves environmental emergencies. In another urgent task, she uses knowledge management in her work at the Ministry. View the illustration on our gallery.

What's next?



Our Digital Diplomacy project addresses the impact of the Internet on diplomacy through research, courses (online and in situ), policy discussions and publications. We invite you to join us:

Our Digital Diplomacy project addresses the impact of the Internet on diplomacy through research, courses (online and in situ), policy discussions and publications. We invite you to join us:

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