The IG blog is the online companion to An Introduction to Internet Governance, which provides a comprehensive overview of the main Internet governance issues and actors. Now in its fourth edition in English, the book has been translated into Serbian/BCS, French, and Armenian. Translated versions of the book Internet governance: Issues, Actors and Divides (an earlier version of An Introduction to Internet Governance) are available in French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Chinese, and Portuguese.



Editor's picture
Webinar digest: Is Brazil leading a new revolution in global digital policy?
By Editor on 4 Oct 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance

The September IG webinar was co-organised by DiploFoundation and the Center for Technology and Society of the Getulio Vargas Foundation in Brazil (CTS/FGV).

Aldo Matteucci's picture
Stakeholders? On tap - not on top!
By Aldo Matteucci on 1 Oct 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance, Home

Kwetching about 'multi-stakeholderism'

Marília Maciel's picture
Brazil-US relations and regional reactions to Snowden’s NSA leaks
By Marília Maciel on 24 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance

An unwritten alliance. This is how the historian Bradford Burns labeled the bilateral relations between Brazil and the United States in the beginning of the XXth century. Since then, there were few moments of tension; potential crises have been successfully dealt with.

Aldo Matteucci's picture
Why we need strong internet governance?
By Aldo Matteucci on 23 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance, Home

(A simplistic view)

Jovan Kurbalija's picture
Are we facing a turning point in global digital politics?
By Jovan Kurbalija on 20 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance

When Brazil speaks on Internet governance (IG) everybody listens. Conference audiences shift from browsing the Net and look at the podium. The buzz in the room is replaced by an almost reverent silence. Every word is carefully heard.

Vladimir Radunovic's picture
Are citizen-run mesh networks the key to an open Internet? Probably not. (Part 2)
By Vladimir Radunovic on 9 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance, Home

Back to Part 1: so - could we then simply boost the mesh networks and connect all of them in a similar mesh way to get the globally green Internet 2?

Vladimir Radunovic's picture
Are citizen-run mesh networks the key to an open Internet? Probably not. (Part 1)
By Vladimir Radunovic on 9 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance, Home

‘Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.’

Darlene Thompson's picture
The History of Wireless Communications in Canada’s Arctic - Part Three
By Darlene Thompson on 5 Sep 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance

Why is the extension of wireless communication so important to Nunavut?  In this, the last blog in this series, we explore the many reasons it is such a significant development

Darlene Thompson's picture
The History of Wireless Communications in Canada’s Arctic - Part Two
By Darlene Thompson on 30 Aug 2013 | From the channel/s:
E-tools, Internet Governance

Remember, there is no such thing as remote in the Internet world?

Darlene Thompson's picture
The History of Wireless Communications in Canada’s Arctic - Part One
By Darlene Thompson on 20 Aug 2013 | From the channel/s:
Internet Governance

We all think the Internet has connected everybody and that there is no longer such a thing as remote--well, I have realized that we are so remote, people don't even think of us as connected!  Have you ever taken an international flight that took you over the “top of the world”?  All of those...

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