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By Alan Franklin on 17 Aug, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

In public international law, the subjects of the law are generally considered to be states and international organisations (IOs); people, corporations and other entities are not bound by, nor entitled to, the benefits of international law. It is often said that international law functions on a different plane than domestic law.

By Ursula Wyss on 06 Aug, 2018 | From the channel/s: Data Reflections, Diplomacy, E-Diplomacy

As someone who has worked in public diplomacy since 2011, I do not remember a time when public diplomacy did not also mean digital diplomacy and, consequently, some manner of data diplomacy. From the beginning, the data we gleaned from social media was heavily dependent on what the social media platforms were willing to provide us with. In terms of data storage and data analytics, institutions need to put a great deal of trust in the data that social media platforms provide. Here are three issues which are crucial for institutions when working with social media and data sets:

By Alan Franklin on 24 Jul, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

We often discuss the issue of immunity of diplomats and consular officers from the jurisdiction of the receiving state. Rarely is the reverse considered; diplomats may sometimes require protection from their sending state.(1)

By Andrijana Gavrilovic on 09 Jul, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy, Webinars

In our July WebDebate, we looked at what new skills are needed for mediators to operate in a conflict environment impacted by the spread of new technologies, what new tools have become available in this context, and how mediators can concretely benefit from these skills and tools.

By Biljana Scott on 25 Jun, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

No true believer ever wavers! No true warrior dies in his bed! No true Norwegian takes sugar in coffee! No true American dishonours the stars and stripes! The No-true-Scotsman fallacy or ‘move’, as it is formally known, is an attempt to defend a generalisation against counter-examples by dismissing them as irrelevant.

By Ryan Gener on 14 Jun, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

Can diplomacy be utilised by a state for its own domestic economic reforms? I attempt to answer this rather unconventional question – particularly focusing on the Philippine context – in my Master in Contemporary Diplomacy dissertation entitled Economic Diplomacy as an Impetus for Philippine Domestic Reforms: Theory, Evidence, and Recommendations.

By Andrijana Gavrilovic on 12 Jun, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy, Webinars

Our June WebDebate tackled the topic of Algorithmic diplomacy. Three issues in this field were discussed in the debate: algorithmic diplomacy in the context of geopolitical analysis and public diplomacy, impact of algorithms on human rights and the question of filter bubbles and online echo chambers that seem to be generated by algorithms.

By Biljana Scott on 11 Jun, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

This blog is the first in a series in which I explore intercultural communication (ICC) through the lens of logical fallacies, linking each fallacy to a current trend or event. I have chosen fallacies in the first instance because, as their name suggests, fallacies are flawed. In so far as these errors in reasoning, and the unjustified conclusions they so often lead us to, tend to exacerbate intercultural misunderstanding, they need to be challenged. My second reason for choosing fallacies is that they have such force.

By Atef Ahmed on 22 May, 2018 | From the channel/s: Diplomacy

Many teachers use global literature to teach cultural and moral sensitivity and a global understanding of peace and wars. Yet the use of Arab and Jewish literature by teachers in the formation of attitudes is still vague.

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