The year 2020 marks 20 years of Diplo’s constant work in the field of online participation, including online courses, webinars, and the online participation of events. This year, the Geneva Internet Platform will look at online participation in p...
 29 Jan 2020

Event
The event, an initiative of the Geneva Internet Platform, supported by the Republic and State of Geneva, and DiploFoundation, will take place on Thursday, 28th February, 2019 at 16:00-18:00 CET (15:00-17:00 UTC) in Auditorium Kruzel, WMO building, 2n...
 28 Feb 2019

Event
Have you seen the recent 10-year challenge on social media - people posting their personal photos from 2008 and 2018 side by side? Our collective data consciousness increased after Cambridge Analytica, so the probable purpose of this meme was quickly...
 30 Jan 2019

Blog post
Mr Djordje Jančić is the Head of the DataTeamat DiploFoundation. Djordje initially worked for Diplo as a consultant and became a full time team member in 2018. Djordje is an Internet marketing specialist, lecturer and owner of&nb...

People
An interactive online capacity development programme Internet governance (IG) has become one of the most important policy areas of our time. Topics like privacy protection, human rights online, and cybersecurity are increasingly in the focus of gl...

Course
Workshop facilitator Mr Jimmy Leach, former Head of Digital Diplomacy at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Now an independent advisor on communications, content and delivery strategies for heads of state, blue chip corporates, start-ups, NGOs, ...
 17 Apr 2018

Event
UPDATES: Read our report on Mediation and AI: Notes on the future of international conflict resolution(19th November 2019) CyberMediation Conference (19th November 2019) Digest and recording of our June 2019 We...

Basic page
CyberMediation New technologies for political mediation: opportunities and risks 13 March, 2018 13.00 - 15.00 CET Geneva Internet Platform (2ndfloor, WMO building), Geneva and online The initiative The development of...
 13 Mar 2018

Event
Workshop facilitator Mr Jimmy Leach, former Head of Digital Diplomacy at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Now an independent advisor on communications, content and delivery strategies for heads of state, blue chip corporates, start-u...
 19 Feb 2018

Event
The first day of the workshop focuses on improving participants’ public and one-to-one speaking skills, through a combination of hands-on exercises designed to help participants identify their strengths and weaknesses, and through analysing positive ...
 20 Dec 2017

Event
New! Consult thedata analysis of the 3rd Geneva Engage Awards Take a look at thephotos of the event Read the press release Background The work done by the United Nations, international org...
 11 Dec 2017

Event
The first day of the workshop focused on improving participants’ public and one-to-one speaking skills, through a combination of hands-on exercises designed to help participants identify their strengths and weaknesses, and through analysing positive ...
 31 Oct 2017

Event
The European Diplomatic Programme is a training programme, organised yearly by theEuropeanExternal Action Service, that promotes the idea of common European diplomacy. It is a common project between the EU member states and EU institution...
 17 May 2017

Event
A heightened awareness of how others speak, and the skill to identify what went well and what could have gone better, help improve our own speaking styles. Using presentations as a medium of delivery – impromptu, extemporaneous, manuscript, and memor...
 21 Apr 2017

Event
Discussions about fake news, ignited right after the US Presidential election in November 2016, have continued to dominate the public debate, as Internet companies increasingly face backlash over the spread of fake news on their platforms. Fake news ...
 8 Mar 2017

Blog post
Geneva Engage Awards 2017 8 February 2017 | 15.00 - 17.30 followed by a cocktail reception DiploFoundation, WMO Building, 7bis Avenue de la Paix, Geneva There is a need to foster effective links between International...
 8 Feb 2017

Event
Filter bubbles describe how our online experiences are taking place in a tailor-made, personalised world that shows like-minded visions and hides views we might not agree with. In 2016, discussions about filter bubbles were on a rise, growing in forc...
 12 Jan 2017

Blog post
Small and developing states with limited geographical, human, and financial resources face the challenge of doing more with less: they need to employ all available methods to increase their representation, including networks, alliances, and informati...

Course
Small and developing states with limited geographical, human, and financial resources face the challenge of doing more with less: they need to employ all available methods to increase their representation, including networks, alliances, and informati...

Course
Diplomatic means can transform the smallness of a state into an asset when promoting national and international interests. This course examines the manner in which small states conduct their diplomacy to pursue their foreign policy objectives, and...

Course
Public diplomacy is a hot topic today, yet only a decade ago, it was a very specialised term. There is a new transparency in the interactions between governments and countries in the international system, influenced by such factors as the democrat...

Course
STATUS:
Open for applications
APPLICATION DEADLINE:
15 October 2020
START DATE:
25 January 2021
FEES:
€7900 (postgraduate diploma) + €2600 (Master's dissertation); Scholarships available
COURSE CODE:
PMCDIPFDL8 / PMCDIGVFDL2
ECTS CREDITS:
90

About the programme

 
Earn an accredited Master’s degree without taking time off work.

The Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy guides working diplomats and international relations professionals through the theoretical and practical building blocks of diplomacy, with a focus on contemporary issues and challenges.

Offered in cooperation with the University of Malta’s Department of International Relations, the programme involves 16 to 20 months of online study, including writing a dissertation. Online areas of study range from the basics of diplomacy (Diplomatic Theory and Practice, Bilateral Diplomacy, Multilateral Diplomacy, and more) to contemporary topics (Artificial Intelligence: Technology, Governance and Policy Frameworks, Sustainable Development Diplomacy, E-Diplomacy, and more).

Internet governance specialisation: Applicants may select Internet governance as an area of specialisation within the Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy. This programme gives current and future Internet policymakers a solid foundation in diplomatic skills and techniques. 

For more information please contact Patrick Borg (Master's Programme Coordinator) on patrickb@diplomacy.edu or +356 21 333 323.

Lecturers

How to apply

How to apply

Complete applications must be received by 15 October 2020 (see instructions for sending documents below).

Please note that by sending your application package, you are confirming that you have read DiploFoundation's Privacy Policy. DiploFoundation will process and share your personal data with third parties (including the University of Malta) for admissions and academic matters, finance, and administrative purposes in accordance with the Privacy Policy.

Late applications will be considered if space remains in the programme. Please contact us if you wish to submit an application after the deadline.

In case of questions, please contact admissions@diplomacy.edu

Required documents

  1. University of Malta application form filled out in full (download form). At the top of the form please indicate February 2021 as the start date. For Section A please indicate the correct course code and title: Master in Contemporary Diplomacy (PMCDIPFDL8); or Master in Contemporary Diplomacy (Internet governance) (PMCDIGVFDL2).
  2. Draft research proposal of around 500 words (relevant to Section F of the application form). You will have the opportunity to revise or change this before beginning work on your dissertation.
  3. Certified true copies of your degree(s) and official transcripts. Documents can be certified by a legal professional or a diplomatic or consular officer or any other professional of good standing, and must be apostilled by the relevant authority in your country.
  4. English translations of degree(s) and transcripts if they are not in English, signed and stamped by translator.
  5. English language proficiency certificate:
    * TOEFL iBT Certificate. Home-based test. More info: https://www.ets.org/s/cv/toefl/at-home/ (minimum requirements: 90 overall with a writing score of at least 24, obtained within the last two years).
    * Academic IELTS Certificate (minimum requirements: 6.0 overall and 6.0 in the reading and writing components). The University of Malta will accept Academic IELTS certificates obtained in the last five years.
    * Cambridge English Proficiency Advanced Certificate (minimum requirements: Grade C or better, obtained within the last two years).
    Please indicate on the application form if you are still waiting for your English language proficiency results. 
    If your undergraduate study programme was taught entirely in English, this may be considered to fulfil the University of Malta’s English language requirement. You must present an official statement from the institution where you studied confirming that the language of instruction and assessment throughout the whole programme  was English.
  6. Certified true copy of the personal details pages of your passport.
  7. If you are requesting partial financial assistance, please include your CV and a motivation letter (300 – 400 words) with your application. The motivation letter should include details of your relevant professional and educational background; reasons for your interest in the programme; and why you feel you should have the opportunity to participate in this programme, i.e. how will your participation benefit you, your institution, and/or your country. Please note that all financial assistance is partial. We do not offer full scholarships. Financial assistance is only available to applicants from developing countries.

The following documents should be sent by e-mail to admissions@diplomacy.edu:

  • Application form
  • Research proposal
  • CV and motivation letter for financial support

The remaining documents must be sent by registered mail to DiploFoundation (attn: Ms Tanja Nikolic), Anutruf Ground Floor, Hriereb Street, Msida MSD 1574, Malta: 

  • Certified true copies of degrees and transcripts
  • Translations of documents not in English
  • Certified true copy of English language proficiency certificate
  • Certified true copy of the personal details page of passport

Please ensure that your application package is complete as we cannot process incomplete applications.

Detailed information

Course details

Description

The Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy, offered in cooperation with the University of Malta, offers significant advantages:

  • Flexible: You design your study programme, deciding on the Postgraduate Diploma or Master’s degree, and selecting from our wide range of courses. You decide when and where to study.
  • Practical and affordable: Programme fees are competitive compared to similar programmes.  Even better, with online study you can continue to work and earn an income. All you need is a computer connected to the Internet.
  • Relevant: Courses cover traditional and contemporary topics in diplomacy, and are kept relevant through discussion of current events and trends. Faculty members include practising and retired diplomats with both theoretical expertise and practical experience in the field.
  • Personalised: Extend your professional network through your classmates and lecturers. Small group sizes emphasise learning together, drawing on the experience and knowledge of participants as well as lecturers.
  • Effective: The programme is highly rated by former participants, who have seen immediate and lasting benefits ranging from personal development to career advances.

The programme has European postgraduate accreditation through the Department of International Relations at the University of Malta, making it recognised worldwide.

The programme language is English, giving non-native speakers a valuable opportunity to practise and hone their skills at expressing and explaining work-related concepts in this international language.

Faculty members include high-ranking, practising and retired diplomats as well as renowned academics in the fields of diplomacy and international relations. For further details please visit our faculty page.

Internet governance specialisation: Applicants may select Internet governance as an area of specialisation within the Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy. Candidates for this area of specialisation will attend several required courses in the area of Internet governance and select their remaining courses from the wide list of diplomacy topics (see Provisional schedule for 2021 for Internet governance specialisation). Candidates will write their dissertations on Internet governance-related topics.

Candidates who successfully complete the Internet governance specialisation will receive a degree/diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy awarded by the University of Malta. Internet governance courses attended – as well as other courses attended – will be listed in the detailed transcript issued on completion of the programme.

Structure

The Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy starts with an online workshop, which takes place over a three week period in January/February. Following the workshop, you will attend five online courses (last ten weeks each), and write your Master’s dissertation.

The option of completing up to two of the online courses before enrolling in the programme offers additional flexibility and financial savings. Please see University of Malta Accredited Courses to learn more about this option.

Phase 1: Introductory workshop

The introductory workshop focuses on building skills used in diplomatic practice, through an interactive and exercise-based set of seminars. The workshop sets the stage for the entire programme and provides the opportunity to get to know other course participants and faculty members. Participants tell us that they keep in touch with classmates and faculty members long after the programme ends and the resulting professional network is highly valuable in their work.

The workshop takes place over a three-week period; you should expect to spend five to six hours of study time per day during this period, including reading and discussing course materials, attending live meetings via a video-conferencing platform, joining group exercises, and completing assignments. 

Phase 2: Online courses

During this phase, you complete five online courses of your choice, each lasting ten weeks. Participation in the courses involves seven to ten hours of study time per week. Online class groups are small to allow for intensive discussion with course lecturers and classmates, and rich collaborative learning.

Courses cover a wide range of both traditional and contemporary topics in diplomacy, many of them not taught elsewhere. Visit our Course Catalogue for a full list of courses and their descriptions.

After successful completion of the introductory workshop and five online courses, you may choose whether to receive the Postgraduate Diploma or to proceed with writing your Master's dissertation. In order to proceed to the Master’s degree you must achieve an average mark of at least 65% for the five online courses.

Phase 3: Dissertation

If you aim for the Master's degree, you will prepare a 25 000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice under the personal online guidance of a research supervisor selected from Diplo's faculty members. You may decide whether to write your dissertation over a four- or eight-month period. Candidates for the Internet governance specialisation will write their dissertations on Internet governance-related topics.

If you completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy in the past and would like to write your Master's dissertation, please see our page on How to Apply for the Master's Dissertation.

Learning methodology

The introductory workshop involves intensive daily online study over a three-week period (five to six hours per day). The workshop aims to build skills for diplomatic practice through a variety of activities: reading and discussing course materials, attending live meetings via a video-conferencing platform, joining group exercises and simulations, and completing assignments. Participants are expected to participate fully in the workshop, and evaluation is based on both participation and graded assignments for each topic covered.

During the online courses, interaction takes place via the Internet through an online classroom. Each week, participants study course materials, adding questions, comments, and references in the form of hypertext entries. Lecturers and other participants read and respond to these entries, creating interaction based on the reading materials. During the week, participants complete additional online activities (e.g. further discussions via blogs or forums, quizzes, group tasks, simulations, or short assignments). At the end of the week, participants and lecturers meet online to discuss the week’s topic. Evaluation is based on discussion contributions and on several assignments for each course.

Writing the dissertation is largely an individual activity. Each participant will work with a supervisor drawn from Diplo's faculty, communicating via e-mail.

Who should apply

This programme will be of interest to:

  • Practising diplomats, civil servants, and others working in international relations who want to refresh or expand their knowledge under the guidance of experienced practitioners and academics.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy or international relations wishing to study topics not offered through their university programmes or diplomatic academies and to gain deeper insight through interaction with practising diplomats.
  • Postgraduate students or practitioners in other fields seeking an entry point into the world of diplomacy.
  • Journalists, staff of international and non-governmental organisations, translators, business people, and others who interact with diplomats and wish to improve their understanding of diplomacy-related topics.

The Internet governance area of specialisation will be of interest to:

  • Individuals interested in developing a career in Internet governance, cybersecurity, and other emerging Internet policy areas.
  • Diplomats and government officials dealing with Internet governance, cybersecurity, and other Internet-related policy issues.
  • Business people and civil society activists involved in multistakeholder Internet governance processes.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy, international relations, and communications wishing to study the multidisciplinary topic of Internet governance, and to gain deeper insight into Internet governance through interaction with diplomats and Internet governance policymakers.
  • Journalists, staff of international and non-governmental organisations, translators, business people, and others who would like to take active part in Internet policy-making.
Prerequisites

Applicants for the Master/Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy must meet University of Malta prerequisites for postgraduate study:

  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject with at least Second Class Honours.
  • English language proficiency certificate:
    • TOEFL iBT Certificate. Home-based test. More info: https://www.ets.org/s/cv/toefl/at-home/ (minimum requirements: 90 overall with a writing score of at least 24, obtained within the last two years).
    • Academic IELTS Certificate (minimum requirements: 6.0 overall and 6.0 in the reading and writing components). The University of Malta will accept Academic IELTS certificates obtained in the last five years..
    • Cambridge English Proficiency Advanced Certificate (minimum requirements: Grade C or better, obtained within the last two years). 

If your undergraduate study programme was taught entirely in English, this may be considered to fulfil the University of Malta’s English language requirement. You must present an official statement from the institution where you studied confirming that the language of instruction and assessment throughout the whole programme was English.

Fees

The fee for the Master in Contemporary Diplomacy is €10,500. The fee has two parts:

  • Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy: €7900.
  • After successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma, participants who choose to write the Master's dissertation pay an additional fee of €2600.

The fee covers:

  • Application and registration fees
  • Tuition fees for online workshop and five online courses
  • Access to all course materials, via Diplo's online classroom
  • Access, via the Internet, to the University of Malta e-journal collection
  • Personal interaction via the online classroom with course lecturers, staff, and other participants
  • Use of Diplo’s online databases and resources
  • Online technical support
  • For the Master's dissertation, personal supervision by one of our faculty members and advising by Diplo staff

A non-refundable application fee of €100 must be submitted with the application package. On acceptance into the programme, the amount of the application fee will be deducted from the course fee.

Financial assistance

DiploFoundation offers a limited number of partial scholarships for the Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy fee, to assist diplomats and others working in international relations from developing countries. Financial assistance is not available to cover the additional fees for the Master's dissertation.

To apply for a scholarship please include your CV and a motivation letter with your application package. The motivation letter should include:

  • Details of your relevant professional and educational background.
  • Reasons for your interest in the programme.
  • Why you feel you should have the opportunity to participate in this programme: how will your participation benefit you, your institution, and/or your country.

As Diplo's ability to offer scholarship support is limited, candidates are strongly encouraged to seek scholarship funding directly from local or international institutions. 

What our alumni say

The critical Internet infrastructure is no longer a dry tech-geek topic. It has drawn attention from the wider Internet community through discussions on Internet names and numbers (domain names such as .amazon, .wine), the Internet of Things (sel...

Course
Diplomacy in the 21st century is more proactive, multidirectional, and innovative than ever before. Our world is increasingly interconnected, as demonstrated by the domestic impact of external issues. New subjects crowd the international agenda. A...

Course
Capacity development has been emerging as a central approach within development for more than two decades. This approach has gradually shifted the focus of development practice from simple financial aid and technical cooperation towards a complex new...

Course
Internet governance (IG) may be more important to you than you realise. Have you been reading and worrying about cybersecurity threats? Does online surveillance concern you and your colleagues? These are important IG issues. Learning more about IG...

Course
E-diplomacy walks the line between continuity and change in our digital era. Diplomatic activities are increasingly supported by Internet and digital tools, and other information and communications technologies (ICTs). Diplomats rely on the Intern...

Course
Today’s headlines often feature the word ‘cyber’, reporting on threats related to the virtual world: online child abuse, stolen credit cards and virtual identities, malware and viruses, botnets and denial-of-service attacks on corporate or government...
Start date:   5 Oct 2020
Register
Course
Explore the origins of multilateral diplomacy and its evolution within a dynamic and rapidly changing environment. This course introduces participants to the diplomatic interaction among more than two actors, with particular emphasis on the multil...

Course
Humanitarian diplomacy is persuading decision makers and opinion leaders to act, at all times, in the interests of vulnerable people, and with full respect for fundamental humanitarian principles. The rapid expansion of the number of humanitar...
Start date:   14 Sep 2020
Register
Course
Protocol is an important part of diplomatic practice linked with history, royalty, religion, culture and language. Protocol involves etiquette on a local and international scale, and the practice of good manners on a daily basis. It evolved as a r...

Course
In recent years, consular and diaspora diplomacy have both emerged as important areas in diplomatic studies; governments are becoming more citizen-centric. Consular diplomacy has gained prominence in many foreign ministries, a dramatic turnaround...

Course
Learn to effectively advance education as a bridge that promotes peace, prosperity, and sustainability. Governments are primarily responsible for fulfilling the right to education for children worldwide. However, global education goals such as...

Course
The number of active users on social networks has increased exponentially over the past few years. If we take Facebook and Twitter, for instance, the number of monthly users surpasses the one billionmark. Diplomats have long realised that in...
 23 Mar 2016

Blog post
"Twitter share price plummets", crowed a host of articles earlier this month, playing to our collective schadenfreude over hyper-successful dot.com.2 companies like Twitter. A 24% fall in share price is certainly more than a wobble, althoug...
 20 Feb 2014

Blog post
Among various ‘endisms’ associated with the Internet, the ‘end of hierarchy’ is one of the most repeated and enduring. Hundreds of articles and books have been written based on two false assumptions: The first is that society was hierarchically or...
 17 Jan 2014

Blog post
New Media is a broad term that can refer to everything from interactive photo and video displays to social blogging platforms, and those who are able to integrate all types of media into compelling narratives will be the most successful journalists. ...
 6 Jan 2014

Blog post
I might have been a little provocative in my blog-post about 'nonsense numbers' in the tracking of online reach and engagement, but the reactions suggest that some people at least agreed with my cynicism. In this post I summarise a couple of ...
 12 Dec 2013

Blog post
Last Monday, in Philadelphia, about 13 000 representatives of law enforcement agencies from around the world met at the 120th Annual International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference and Law Enforcement Education and Technology Exhibition. ...
 28 Oct 2013

Blog post
Poll on attitudes to e-diplomacy post-Snowden: to the right of this blog is a poll to help us gauge the impact of the continuing events triggered by Edward Snowden's leaks to the UK Guardian about the kind of social sharing we didn't want. I ...
 16 Sep 2013

Blog post
It’s not a gun that kills someone; it’s the person who pulls the trigger. It’s not Facebook or e-mail that ruins people’s lives, it’s the person who posts the message – or worse still, mindlessly forwards and share...
 30 Aug 2013

Blog post
Over the course of the last couple of months, I must have read close to 40 crime novels by everyone from Michael Connelly to Val McDermid. I’ve noticed that I’m becoming increasingly paranoid; my imagination is running away with me. Holes...
 29 Aug 2013

Blog post
Recently, I made a phone call to a restaurant to check if their renovations were complete and whether they had re-opened for business. After a few rings, I was directed to their answering machine. I followed that up by searching for them ...
 26 Aug 2013

Blog post
I was recently introduced to the term 'emerging adult'. As I belong to a generation that moved to adulthood on receipt of their first full-time paycheck, it took me by surprise. I hadn't realised that we had a new, official, transitory pe...
 16 Aug 2013

Blog post
'Advice on how to use Social Media effectively in a way that isn't massively time consuming' was the question on an excellent LinkedIn group 'Social Media for Nonprofit Organizations'(54K members). There are two lessons ther...
 14 Aug 2013

Blog post
“The net is finished as a global network” wrote John Naughton this weekend, in a major UK Sunday newspaper, which, ironically, is part of the British press which he rages have lost the plot in their reporting of the NSA/PRISM revelations ...
 31 Jul 2013

Blog post
My Facebook page was full of updates on Istanbul on Monday morning and to my shame I hadn't realised that anything untoward was going on over there. I spent most of the weekend offline amidst the poppies and vineyards at the Balaton and then had ...
 4 Jun 2013

Blog post
“A most unfortunate misunderstanding in US social media”, as the Czech ambassador to the US called the confusion of many American social media users that the two suspects of the Boston marathon bombings come from the Czech republic, a cou...
 21 Apr 2013

Blog post
I enjoyed Pete's post: Social Media and online learning - is it such an obvious marriage?as much as I enjoyed the original debate, Social media can enrich online learning as part of Diplo's Online Learning Day. This is my response: ...
 17 Apr 2013

Blog post
It’s at least likely that you’re one of the over 100 million people who have seen the Kony2012 video. Perhaps you’ve tweeted, blogged, Facebooked (sic – it really is a verb), Tumblrd or passed it on in other ways. The video wa...
 4 Mar 2013

Blog post
Twitter empowers users at both ends – both the broadcaster as well as the public – and it allows a level of engagement hardly achieved with more traditional tools. 'Twitter means quick communication & dialogue & easy access...
 8 Mar 2013

Event
Embassies and Ministriesdiffer only in the extent to which they embrace the new media and mainstream it in their activities. Much has been written in thepast three years about this e-diplomacy. In this webinar, our lecturer Pete Cranston...
 8 Feb 2013

Event
In the early 1800s, John Marshall wrote: “To listen well is as powerful a means of communication and influence as to talk well.” The longest-serving Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court and the father of American Constitutional Law, Mars...
 3 Dec 2012

Blog post
As my number of friends on Facebook creeps towards an abitrary figure above which I have decided that the list would be unmanageable, I am at a loss to decide who to defriend. Will they notice? Will they be upset? Will they care? And then I see today...
 7 Sep 2012

Blog post
In Part 2 of a two-part blog, guest blogger and UK-based freelance journalist Alex Oxborough asks that you give journalists something to work with. In our ever more connected world of Twitter trending and 24-hour news, working with the media can fee...
 15 Aug 2012

Blog post
Try removing an unwanted tattoo. Many dermatologists will tell you that removal depends on colour, depth, and length of treatment. In some cases, you can expect scarring or discolouration. Whether or not you have a tattoo, the information you post o...
 1 Aug 2012

Blog post
I've come to accept the place social media has in our twenty-first-century lives and although I bemoan the fact that real-life communication is being replaced by virtual communication, that real-life friendships are losing out to virtual friendsh...
 24 Jul 2012

Blog post
‘Social media for sceptics’ could have been a subtitle for the coaching programme we have been running with Diplo staff and teaching faculty. Distinguished and deeply experienced diplomats and educators were presented over the four weeks ...
 18 May 2012

Blog post
I very nearly didn't finish Susan Tardanico's recent article in Forbes Magazine when I saw her trot out the urban legend that 93% of communication is non-verbal. But I persevered because her topic is one that I've been discussing a lot la...
 8 May 2012

Blog post
Facebook’s $1billion purchase of the photo-editing and display platform Instagram has split the digital commentariat, illustrated by two differing perspectives in the same UK newspaper, the Sunday Observer. An enthusiastic piece in the main pap...
 16 Apr 2012

Blog post
Australia's Lowy Institute for International Policy, an independent think tank, has produced an in-depth paper on ediplomacy activities at the US Department of State. Titled Revolution @State: The Spread of Ediplomacy, the report by F...
 13 Apr 2012

Blog post
A new post by guest blogger, Steven Nelson, a teacher, trainer, translator, interpreter, and writer. Steven is a graduate of Mary Washington College (BA in International Studies) and Central European University (MA in Nationalism Studies) and l...
 4 Apr 2012

Blog post
The destiny of ACTA (the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) is an example of the limits of traditional diplomacy and the potentials of e-participation in political life. This shift in the way policy is made was confirmed by Maroš Šef...
 23 Mar 2012

Blog post
'Twitter Diplomacy', an articleby US NPR (National Public Radio),sparkeda flurry of interest on Twitter itself. The original article posed both sides of the case for 'Statecraft 2.0'. It highlighted the view of...
 23 Feb 2012

Blog post
In a recent interview with Diplo’s Stephanie Borg Psaila, Karen Melchior, First Secretary at the Danish Embassy in London, talks about how she has been able to integrate the use of social media in her everyday work. As a student of diplomacy, I...
 7 Feb 2012

Blog post

Description:

We are witnessing an extreme proliferation of the social networks, which can be seen in two ways: an expansion of social network websites, and an increase in the number of people who are starting to use them. The author describes the risks associated with social networks, mostly associated with user's privacy, and the responsibility for those risks. This paper also analyses whether the rules proscribed so that social network providers can distance themselves from possible abuses are really designed to help the users be safe.

Source: 
Internet governance research paper
 Maša Kojić , 2010
 
Printer Friendly and PDF

Description:

The paper takes a look at concrete case studies in Nigeria, Ghana, and Côte d’Ivoire and looks at different levels of citizens’ engagement in public policy and how social media and networks are being used. Interviews, questions, consultations, discussions, and surveys were conducted, which led to the discovery that things are happening in strange places and that the potential of social media and networks in citizen policy engagement can only be likened to a pregnancy whose term is already here.

Source: 
Internet governance research paper
 Nnenna Nwakanma , 2010
 
Printer Friendly and PDF
It’s the first time I’ve come across it, and it’s so true: the use of social networks has become a necessary life skill, especially for children. I’m quoting a blog post from Forbes, which talks about what one school (the Sch...
 25 Oct 2011

Blog post
If you want to raise awareness among parents on the effects of social networks on their children, try passing a law like Missouri’s Senate Bill 45. The new law is making it illegal for teachers to have private contact with students on any onli...
 22 Aug 2011

Blog post
‘You don’t get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies.’ If you haven’t watched the movie, I won’t be spoiling it by saying who the enemies are, even though there’s much more to the movie. And in that ...
 6 Nov 2010

Blog post
'Your 37 friends are waiting', says the Facebook e-mail which I have just received. They’re waiting for me to accept their friend request. That is, for me to share personal information, photos of me and my loved ones, and other bits of info which six...
 16 Oct 2010

Blog post
Subscribe to SocialMedia