Robust and inclusive Internet governance must reflect the growing relevance of the Internet for global economic, social, and political life. Many small and developing countries in general and their civil societies in particular are excluded from inte...

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‘We must end the obsession with creating new “types” of diplomacy.’ writes Shaun Riordan in his recent post for the blog of the Center on Public Diplomacy. Indeed, those practices we describe as diplomacy are expanding. We are seeing discussions on d...
 30 Jun 2017

Blog post
Small and developing states with limited geographical, human, and financial resources face the challenge of doing more with less: they need to employ all available methods to increase their representation, including networks, alliances, and informati...

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Small and developing states with limited geographical, human, and financial resources face the challenge of doing more with less: they need to employ all available methods to increase their representation, including networks, alliances, and informati...

Course
Capacity development has been emerging as a central approach within development for more than two decades. This approach has gradually shifted the focus of development practice from simple financial aid and technical cooperation towards a complex new...

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Humanitarian diplomacy is persuading decision makers and opinion leaders to act, at all times, in the interests of vulnerable people, and with full respect for fundamental humanitarian principles. The rapid expansion of the number of humanitar...
Start date:   14 Sep 2020
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On 4 May, the Geneva Internet Platform and ICANN organised an open discussion on Ensuring Civil Society's Voice is Heard in ICANN. The discussion, held in Geneva, brought together experts involved in ICANN processes, and newcomers to the process,...
 13 May 2016

Blog post

Description:

In the fourth chapter of the book, Britta Sadou, focuses on non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Sadou introduces this particular group as civil society actors and continues by discussing possibilities provided to NGOs by various UN summits. The author highlights some of the main world conferences during the 1990s and early 2000s and poses two important questions - Has the time of those huge events come to an end? What could be the alternatives? Sadou also discusses proposals of the  “Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations-Civil Society Relations" and finally reflects on the question of how the presence of so many NGO representatives at the 1990s world conferences influenced the UN’s attitude toward inclusion of the “new” actors. What was heard from so many voices?

Source: 
Multistakeholder Diplomacy - Challenges and Opportunities. Ed by J. Kurbalija and V. Katrandjiev (2006)
 Britta Sadoun , 2006
 
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