Search form

Comments (6)

avatar

Ginger Paque September 07, 2016

This is a very useful summary, thanks! We are just finishing the Internet Technology and Policy online course, and this week's topic is Emerging Technologies, so I am sensitised to these issues. You said 'Moreover, G20 commits to further work on strengthening cooperation on standards related to emerging technologies' -- so I searched for 'standards' on the documents you mention, and found an interesting point: most of the references to standards on the full document deal with transparency, taxes, and financial transactions, not technical standards. I had not expected this since I was approaching the document from the angle of how increased harmonisation of technical standards might affect security (does more standardisation make the Internet of Things more vulnerable to widespread hacks?) because this point was raised in class discussions. Do you or other readers have more information or analyses on this topic?
avatar

Nacho Estrada (not verified) September 07, 2016

Dear Ginger, About your question ("does more standardisation make the Internet of Things more vulnerable to widespread hacks?"), I think it is the opposite. More standardisation will help develop stronger and more secure technologies since smaller IoT companies can benefit each other sharing their best practices (and budgets) instead of having to invest on building and then securing their own standards. This could end in them out of business after competing with bigger companies (and budgets).
avatar

Jovan Kurbalija September 08, 2016

Ginger, there are references to standardisation and emerging technologies in the Blueprint on Innovative Growth: the section 3 (New Industrial Revolution): 'enhancing cooperation on standards' and the section 4 (Digital Economy): supporting the development and use of international standards'.
avatar

Jovan Kurbalija September 08, 2016

Sorina, most of digital documents and speeches have this dichotomy of possibilities and risks which new technology brings. It is interesting to notice a shift towards possibilities in Hangzhou comparing to more 'risk narrative' in Antalya's resolution. It will be interesting to follow this possibilities/risks framing in the future G20 (and other) documents.
avatar

Stephanie Borg ... September 08, 2016

Thanks for a useful summary! The Electronic World Trade Platform initiative (eWTP - aimed at helping SMEs with cross-border e-commerce) might also be worth following. G20 leaders simply took note of B20's proposal, but it is receiving media attention especially in China.
avatar

Vladimir Radunovic September 09, 2016

It is interesting to observe the difference between the Antalya and this document with regards to security. The Antalya document (Para 26) went very specifically into risks, particularly economic espionage and state behavior - details that were somewhat surprising. This one - including the blueprint - is extremely empty, and only refers to the Antalya document. It is very shallow on cyber-risks, even though it covers risks and threats in other areas (finance, food, health). Not even cybercrime or the use of ICT in terrorism was mentioned, which could be somewhat safe grounds. I wonder if this signals a growing gap in positions among the main actors on cybersecurity? Let's see what the UN Group of Governmental Experts will bring in the next months.

Leave a comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Scroll to Top