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If you are overwhelmed with the daily routine of the here and now and don’t have time to step back and reflect. If you feel that you are increasingly surprised by new developments. If you feel that the lack of a broader picture makes your work less effective. Then you’ve landed on the right page.

Looking Sideways aims to make you step back, explore and reconsider. It aims to empower you to take a different tack to the challenge at hand. It aims to provide novel facts and evidence-based insights, and deconstruct self-evident truths (which are often just socially endorsed stereotypes). When the truth is no more than lies waiting to come out, curiosity is the best medicine.

Find about it here.



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By Readings on 21 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

150 years ago the issue of slavery tore the US apart. The Union survived thanks to military power, but also the efforts of Pres. Abraham Lincoln and others, prominent among them William H.

Aldo Matteucci's picture
By Aldo Matteucci on 16 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

When I first mentioned to a diplomatic friend my intention of writing a blog entry on “diplomats without borders” I was met with incredulity. “Diplomats are the peacetime gate keepers at the border! You can’t have diplomats without borders.”

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By Aldo Matteucci on 14 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

It’s a twisting lane winding its way between by squat buildings huddled together. People mill back and forth creating confusion. Small shops, following one another, spill trashy products onto the narrow passage. The air is stale, and so is the sun; dust thickens into stench.

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By Aldo Matteucci on 11 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

While writing up the blog entries on Positive Deviance (see my 175 and 176) I decided to read Isaiah BERLIN’s famous essay: Two concepts of liberty[1]. BERLIN’s discursive style is always a pleasure to read, though at times it feels meandering and imprecise.

Mary's picture
By Mary on 11 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

I'm a 1960s child, which technically makes me part of the a 'Baby Boomer' generation. I know stuff about things and manage to get through life in my own peculiar, modestly successful fashion. One of my failings though is that I am not technically savvy. Plugs scare me.

Aldo Matteucci's picture
By Aldo Matteucci on 9 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

In blog entry 178 I have provided an example of how we fail to see what’s obvious, if it does not fit our preconceived ideas.

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By Aldo Matteucci on 7 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

It’s obvious (and efficient): we humans communicate differences and presume commonalities.

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By Aldo Matteucci on 5 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

The Ford Edsel[1] was one of the “greatest brand blunders of all times” – a car designed by market experts that never sold. By the time it came on line in 1958-1960 taste had changed. Ford’s CEO happened to be Robert McNamara, who built the next Edsel: the Vietnam war[2].
 

Aldo Matteucci's picture
By Aldo Matteucci on 3 Oct 2012 | From the channel/s: 

In 175 I’ve described Positive Deviance (PD) and given some examples from the field. I hope they were intriguing enough to get you to reflect on this “new” approach.

Aldo Matteucci's picture
By Aldo Matteucci on 30 Sep 2012 | From the channel/s: 

It probably is just a further instance of ignorance on my part. I’d never heard of “positive deviance” (PD) as a way to “solve the world’s toughest problems”[1].

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