Communication between information technologists and their clients – including diplomats - does not work as well as it should. We know that information technology has become ubiquitous.

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Eduardo Gelbstein, 2004

There is hardly any need to stress that the relations between the adherents of the three great religions of the Mediterranean, as indeed of all other religions, are more affected by the images that each group has of the other than by the precise content of the theological beliefs held by the...

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Peter Serracino Inglott, 2004

Is there a specific, distinctive diplomatic culture?

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Kishan S. Rana, 2004

Building international diplomacy requires understanding ourselves, others, and how we relate together. It also involves understanding how others relate among themselves.

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Sandra Gillespie, 2004

IC and Diplomacy - Intercultural Competence and its Relevance for International DiplomacyThe changing nature of international diplomacy requires new knowledge and awareness of intercultural and other skills needed to perform effectively in the role of diplomat.

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Daniel J. Kealey, Doug MacDonald and Thomas Vulpe, 2004

This papers examines how the Macedonians and the Albanians live in Macedonia. How do they communicate? Is there friendship everywhere? How do the two nations, live together, how do they communicate.

Source: Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: Marina Tuneva-Jovanovska, 2004

In his paper, Alex Sceberras Trigona stresses the importance of the diplomatic document as a primary source of diplomatic knowledge, in the light of the distinction between ‘information’ (can be recorded) and knowledge (not easily recorded), the flow of knowledge as information.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Alex Sceberras Trigona, 2002

In this paper we aim to provide a comprehensive introduction to the topic of knowledge management in diplomacy. First we provide working definitions of knowledge and knowledge management, and examine the evolution of the concepts.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Jovan Kurbalija, 2002

In this chapter, Walter Fust talks about the role of knowledge management, and knowledge for development, in diplomacy. He describes various methods to assess what knowledge should be stocked, and explains the need for managers who are assigned the task of deciding what should be stocked.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: Walter Fust, 2002

In this chapter, John Pace decribes the three-phase evolution of knowledge management in the human rights program of the United Nations. The realisation that knowledge management is a necessity came during the third phase.

Source: Knowledge and Diplomacy. Ed by J. Kurbalija (2002)
Author: John Pace, 2002

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