Europe has many borders. Its small countries with millenary histories and diversities offer a variety of intercultural challenges. Culture plays an essential role in both promoting and hindering change and in affecting Europeans’ view of their present and future attitudes toward cooperation and integration. The EU originated in the effort to create and share a common market economy. However, policies and

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Elena A. A. Garcea
Year: 
2004

IC and Diplomacy - Intercultural Competence and its Relevance for International DiplomacyThe changing nature of international diplomacy requires new knowledge and awareness of intercultural and other skills needed to perform effectively in the role of diplomat. The research presented in this paper serves to inform current and future planning for the selection, training, and evaluation of international diplomats.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Daniel J. Kealey, Doug MacDonald and Thomas Vulpe
Year: 
2004

This paper develops a model of diplomacy training based on intercultural competence and situated learning and applies the model to intercultural encounters.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Yunxia Zhu
Year: 
2004

Today the world is becoming smaller and smaller - distances shrink and become irrelevant, information flows are immense and very fast. People tend to speak foreign languages and, to their surprise, find out that this is not enough. There is more to it, and it is culture. It is of paramount importance to educate a generation of people capable of communicating effectively and working together with representatives of other cultures.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Alena Korshuk
Year: 
2004

This essay examines and seeks to explode the notion that diplomats are, or should be, immune to emotion in the conduct of their duties. It also discusses the concept of emotion cultures - cultural rules governing the experience and expression of emotion and suggests the possibility that modern diplomacy, perhaps a distinctive culture in itself, encourages the socialisation of diplomats into a distinctive, ostensibly global diplomatic emotion culture.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Wynne Elizabeth Russell
Year: 
2004

Is there a specific, distinctive diplomatic culture? Given the fact that the conduct of diplomacy is regulated by international law and by custom, and since the structures through which states conduct their external relations, both bilateral and multilateral, are standardised, it is fair to say that both the institutions and the process form a pattern of their own, unique to this profession. The professional diplomatist actors on the international stage, and their institutions, display certain shared characteristics.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Kishan S. Rana
Year: 
2004

IC and Diplomacy - The Idea of Diplomatic Culture and its Sources

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Paul Sharp
Year: 
2004

Diplomats have often been blamed for failing to prevent the outbreak of the First World War. This failure was, however, the result of their culture and of the expectations placed on them by their governments, which were mostly restricted to the conduct of ordinary and peaceful bilateral relations. They were not prepared for, nor instructed, to intervene actively in conflict prevention. This paper discusses the evolution of diplomatic culture as we know it.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Dietrich Kappeler
Year: 
2004

This paper focuses on interactions between states, international organisations and local authorities in the implementation of the Dayton Accords for Bosnia and Herzegovina. It stresses the importance of reassessing the very mechanism of functioning of the international community and its efforts for post-war reconstruction, including the issues of mutual cooperation, elaboration of existing structures and vision and perspective for the future.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Nadia Boyadjieva and Kostadin Grozev
Year: 
2004

Communication between information technologists and their clients – including diplomats - does not work as well as it should. We know that information technology has become ubiquitous. We also know that diplomats rely extensively on web services, electronic mail and documents in electronic form. Yet when communication does not work well, technologists poorly understand the needs of the diplomatic community. As a result, technical solutions may not address the real needs of end-users. This paper is a study on inter-professional miscommunication.

Source: 
Intercultural Communication and Diplomacy. Ed by H. Slavik (2004)
Author: 
Eduardo Gelbstein
Year: 
2004

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