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Overview

Protocol is an important part of diplomatic practice linked with history, royalty, religion, culture and language.

Protocol involves etiquette on a local and international scale, and the practice of good manners on a daily basis. It evolved as a result of old traditions, when in the early days of civilization hospitality was extended to an arriving guest. Today it is particularly important because it not only covers the ceremonial rules that are followed during official functions and how to behave on these special occasions, but it also provides a set of established rules of courteousness that are to be respected in society. This course introduces participants to the ceremonial aspect of protocol procedures, behavior of etiquette, rules of courteousness in society, and respect for precedence. It also helps business executives master the basics of etiquette and get a better understanding of multicultural manners.

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Open for applications: 

No

Application deadline: 
TBA
Start date: 
TBA
Course code: 
n/a
ECTS credits: 
0
Mode(s) of study: 
Certificate

This is the best way for me to study and work at the same time.

Radka Angelova
Course participant
Course details

Protocol is an important part of diplomatic practice linked with history, royalty, religion, culture and language.

Protocol involves etiquette on a local and international scale, and the practice of good manners on a daily basis. It evolved as a result of old traditions, when in the early days of civilization hospitality was extended to an arriving guest. Today it is particularly important because it not only covers the ceremonial rules that are followed during official functions and how to behave on these special occasions, but it also provides a set of established rules of courteousness that are to be respected in society. This course introduces participants to the ceremonial aspect of protocol procedures, behavior of etiquette, rules of courteousness in society, and respect for precedence. It also helps business executives master the basics of etiquette and get a better understanding of multicultural manners.

By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Introduce themselves and others appropriately and engage in initial conversation.
  • Present themselves, and their organisations, with confidence.
  • Use handshakes effectively and present and receive business cards appropriately.
  • Use correct titles and forms of address in different contexts.
  • Prepare invitations for various events and different levels of formality; prepare notes of acceptance and decline for events.
  • Plan and prepare for hosting important events and meeting dignitaries.
  • Plan seating arrangements and balance table seating.
  • React in an appropriate and proactive manner to arising protocol-related questions and issues.

Course outline

  1. Introduction to protocol and etiquette: historical background of protocol; how the unwritten rules of courtesy and ceremonial acted as catalysts in the development of protocol procedures as we know them today; the importance of first impressions; how handshakes act as a means of communication when meeting someone for the first time.
  2. Introductions and business cards: the importance of making a proper introduction: When does one introduce oneself? When do we introduce others? Commonly made mistakes during introductions; the history of visiting cards and their use as adopted by different countries.
  3. Establishment of diplomatic relations and presentation of credentials:  an introduction to the procedures normally followed for the establishment of diplomatic relations, the appointment of an ambassador, and his arrival in the host country; how the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961) relates to the life of a diplomat.
  4. Order of precedence, titles and forms of address: What is an order of precedence and how is it applied at formal functions? What kind of precedence exists among the diplomatic corps and what does the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961) say about the order of precedence? The importance of titles and forms of address; how dignitaries should be addressed in a manner appropriate to the office they occupy; how to address such dignitaries in writing.
  5. Invitations: how invitations originated; the difference between formal and informal invitations; the proper wording used on diplomatic invitations; forms of replies and declines.
  6. Attending events and planning table seating: attending receptions; the receiving line; official luncheons and dinners; and various seating arrangements.
  7. Entertaining: the list of host duties when hosting various functions and the respective duties of the guests; the purpose of toasts, when they are given and the general format used when giving a toast; table manners and other important issues related to diplomatic entertaining.
  8. State visits: preparation for state visits; the programme involved; dress codes, decorations and flag etiquette.

 

Reviews

Not only did I acquire a lot of useful practical information about protocol and etiquette, but it helped me equally to widen my understanding of the different topics discussed. The fact that the class was heterogeneous and the participants attending the course from different backgrounds made the on-line sessions very stimulating and resourceful.

Mariangela Lundgren-Resenterra
Deputy Secretary General in charge of diplomatic and military affairs at the Department of Security of the State of Geneva, Switzerland
July, 2012

I was very happy to see the Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette on this year's list. The courses are very interactive, provide lots of practical examples, case studies, real time discussions among the participants and the lecturer. The lecture texts and the assignment questions are well-balanced and encouraging analytical and critical thinking. I particularly appreciated the case studies and practical examples provided throughout the course.

Radka Angelova
Administrative Assistant, OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities
July 2012
Who should apply

This course will be of interest to:

  • Practising diplomats, civil servants, and others working in international relations who want to refresh or expand their knowledge under the guidance of experienced practitioners and academics.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy or international relations wishing to study topics not offered through their university programmes or diplomatic academies and to gain deeper insight through interaction with practising diplomats.
  • Postgraduate students or practitioners in other fields seeking an entry point into the world of diplomacy.
  • Journalists, staff of international and non-governmental organisations, translators, business people and others who interact with diplomats and wish to improve their understanding of diplomacy-related topics.
Prerequisites

Applicants for the course must have:

  • An undergraduate university degree OR three years of work experience and appropriate professional qualifications in diplomacy or international relations.
  • Sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and submitting written essay assignments of up to 2500 words in length).
  • Regular access to the Internet (dial-up connection is sufficient, although broadband is preferable).
Fees

The fee for the course in Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette is €650 (Diplo Certificate Course)

How to apply

Applicants for certificate courses should apply online.

If you are applying for financial assistance, please upload your CV and a motivation letter with your application. The motivation letter should include:

  • Details of your relevant professional and educational background.
  • Reasons for your interest in the course.
  • Why you feel you should have the opportunity to participate in this course: how will your participation benefit you, your institution and/or your country?

Please note that financial assistance from DiploFoundation is available only to applicants from developing countries. Late applications will be considered if there are spaces available in the course.

Print course info
Course details:

Protocol is an important part of diplomatic practice linked with history, royalty, religion, culture and language.

Protocol involves etiquette on a local and international scale, and the practice of good manners on a daily basis. It evolved as a result of old traditions, when in the early days of civilization hospitality was extended to an arriving guest. Today it is particularly important because it not only covers the ceremonial rules that are followed during official functions and how to behave on these special occasions, but it also provides a set of established rules of courteousness that are to be respected in society. This course introduces participants to the ceremonial aspect of protocol procedures, behavior of etiquette, rules of courteousness in society, and respect for precedence. It also helps business executives master the basics of etiquette and get a better understanding of multicultural manners.

By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Introduce themselves and others appropriately and engage in initial conversation.
  • Present themselves, and their organisations, with confidence.
  • Use handshakes effectively and present and receive business cards appropriately.
  • Use correct titles and forms of address in different contexts.
  • Prepare invitations for various events and different levels of formality; prepare notes of acceptance and decline for events.
  • Plan and prepare for hosting important events and meeting dignitaries.
  • Plan seating arrangements and balance table seating.
  • React in an appropriate and proactive manner to arising protocol-related questions and issues.

Course outline

  1. Introduction to protocol and etiquette: historical background of protocol; how the unwritten rules of courtesy and ceremonial acted as catalysts in the development of protocol procedures as we know them today; the importance of first impressions; how handshakes act as a means of communication when meeting someone for the first time.
  2. Introductions and business cards: the importance of making a proper introduction: When does one introduce oneself? When do we introduce others? Commonly made mistakes during introductions; the history of visiting cards and their use as adopted by different countries.
  3. Establishment of diplomatic relations and presentation of credentials:  an introduction to the procedures normally followed for the establishment of diplomatic relations, the appointment of an ambassador, and his arrival in the host country; how the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961) relates to the life of a diplomat.
  4. Order of precedence, titles and forms of address: What is an order of precedence and how is it applied at formal functions? What kind of precedence exists among the diplomatic corps and what does the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961) say about the order of precedence? The importance of titles and forms of address; how dignitaries should be addressed in a manner appropriate to the office they occupy; how to address such dignitaries in writing.
  5. Invitations: how invitations originated; the difference between formal and informal invitations; the proper wording used on diplomatic invitations; forms of replies and declines.
  6. Attending events and planning table seating: attending receptions; the receiving line; official luncheons and dinners; and various seating arrangements.
  7. Entertaining: the list of host duties when hosting various functions and the respective duties of the guests; the purpose of toasts, when they are given and the general format used when giving a toast; table manners and other important issues related to diplomatic entertaining.
  8. State visits: preparation for state visits; the programme involved; dress codes, decorations and flag etiquette.

 

Who should apply:

This course will be of interest to:

  • Practising diplomats, civil servants, and others working in international relations who want to refresh or expand their knowledge under the guidance of experienced practitioners and academics.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy or international relations wishing to study topics not offered through their university programmes or diplomatic academies and to gain deeper insight through interaction with practising diplomats.
  • Postgraduate students or practitioners in other fields seeking an entry point into the world of diplomacy.
  • Journalists, staff of international and non-governmental organisations, translators, business people and others who interact with diplomats and wish to improve their understanding of diplomacy-related topics.
Methodology:

This course is conducted entirely online over a period of ten weeks. Reading materials and tools for online interaction are provided through an online classroom. Each week, participants read the provided lecture text, adding questions, comments and references in the form of hypertext entries. Lecturers and other participants read and respond to these entries, creating interaction based on the lecture text. During the week, participants complete additional online activities (for example, further discussion via blogs or forums, quizzes, group tasks, simulations or short assignments). At the end of the week, participants and lecturers meet online in a chat room to discuss the week’s topic. To complete the course successfully, participants must write several essay assignments. Courses are based on a collaborative approach to learning, involving a high level of interaction.

This course requires a minimum of five to seven hours of study time per week.

Prerequisites:

Applicants for the course must have:

  • An undergraduate university degree OR three years of work experience and appropriate professional qualifications in diplomacy or international relations.
  • Sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and submitting written essay assignments of up to 2500 words in length).
  • Regular access to the Internet (dial-up connection is sufficient, although broadband is preferable).
Fees:

The fee for the course in Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette is €650 (Diplo Certificate Course)

How to apply:

Applicants for certificate courses should apply online.

If you are applying for financial assistance, please upload your CV and a motivation letter with your application. The motivation letter should include:

  • Details of your relevant professional and educational background.
  • Reasons for your interest in the course.
  • Why you feel you should have the opportunity to participate in this course: how will your participation benefit you, your institution and/or your country?

Please note that financial assistance from DiploFoundation is available only to applicants from developing countries. Late applications will be considered if there are spaces available in the course.