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Overview

Technological developments have had a considerable impact on privacy, a fundamental right enshrined in nearly every country's constitution.

Stakeholders are concerned with a varying range of privacy issues. For governments, cybersecurity prompts the need for surveillance and effective legislative instruments. For businesses, the collection and processing of personal data is viewed as critical. The architecture of the Internet itself raises new concerns. Often at the opposite end of these issues lays the end-user's need and right for the protection of one's privacy and personal data.

The 10-week course on Privacy and Personal Data Protection delves into the details of many of the global and local discussions surrounding privacy, the main instruments dealing with data protection and information privacy, their effects on national and regional regulations, emerging privacy issues such as anonymous expression, social networks, and cloud computing, the risks and challenges related to cybersecurity concerns, and the roles that companies play in the privacy protection ecosystem.

Click on the orange tabs above for course details, methodology, prerequisites, fees, and how to apply.

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Open for applications: 

No

Application deadline: 
TBA
Start date: 
TBA
Course code: 
IGCBP13
ECTS credits: 
0
Mode(s) of study: 
Certificate
Course details

Technological developments have had a considerable impact on privacy, a fundamental right enshrined in nearly every country's constitution.

Stakeholders are concerned with a varying range of privacy issues. For governments, cybersecurity prompts the need for surveillance and effective legislative instruments. For businesses, the collection and processing of personal data is viewed as critical. The architecture of the Internet itself raises new concerns. Often at the opposite end of these issues lays the end-user's need and right for the protection of one's privacy and personal data.

The 10-week course on Privacy and Personal Data Protection delves into the details of many of the global and local discussions surrounding privacy, the main instruments dealing with data protection and information privacy, their effects on national and regional regulations, emerging privacy issues such as anonymous expression, social networks, and cloud computing, the risks and challenges related to cybersecurity concerns, and the roles that companies play in the privacy protection ecosystem.

By the end of the course, participants should:

  • be able to explain the overarching issues involved in Privacy and Personal Data Protection issues, with the complexities and implications (economic, social, professional, political and civic leisure) for individual user rights;
  • be familiar with, and discuss the importance of the principal international privacy instruments including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union;
  • understand the concepts underlying privacy protections, anonymity and the freedom of expression, including the limitations and controversies, and the possible conflicts between privacy and freedom of expression;
  • be able to discuss international due process standards including surveillance, transparency and other reports. Understand different regional situations and contrasts;
  • understand and be able to discuss emerging privacy issues from a government standpoint, such as the secrecy of communications, mandatory data retention, lawful access, encryption and decryption keys, national ID, passports and biometrics, digital rights management (DRM), deep packet inspection (DPI), and spyware;
  • be able to explain what is involved in computer crime, cybersecurity, and privacy, including the positions and discussions taking place in, for example, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Organisation for Security and Co-Operation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF);
  • be able to explain emerging consumer privacy topics such as conditions for consent, the right to be forgotten, data portability, data protection by design and by default, privacy challenges,behavioural targeting techniques, data minimisation and search engines, social networks and data protection, cloud computing, facial recognition and SIM cards.

The course forms part of the Thematic Phase of Diplo’s Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme (IGCBP). This phase offers in-depth courses that provide deeper understanding of a particular issue. Other courses forming part of this phase - which may run simultaneously or at a later date - include Cybersecurity, E-participation, History of Internet Governance, Infrastructure and Critical Internet Resources, Intellectual Property Rights, and ICT Policy and Strategic Planning.

Excerpt from course materials

Social networking applications have been available since the early days of the Internet, in the form of bulletin boards, chat, and multi-user dungeons. Currently, Web 2.0 architecture makes social-oriented applications easy to enter and use, leading to the development of web-based communities gathered around social networking sites, blogs, or wikis. These applications allow users to upload personal information, as detailed as one chooses to disclose, and to make it available to a circle of friends or to all of the website users. However, it is also possible for law enforcement agencies and businesses to obtain the information.

Moreover, the tendency towards ‘thin-client architecture’, where applications are stored on a central server and the interface is just a web browser, also changes the way individuals organise their work and private files. As thin-client architecture is a service offered by private companies, user data is available to their web servers, making lawful access requirements different.

Course outline

The advanced thematic course in Privacy and Personal Data Protection covers the following topics:

  • Introduction to Global Privacy and Data Protection provides an overview of the main themes and defines privacy and data protection; the text analyses whether privacy is a cultural value, and whether it is ‘dead’; it explores traditional and new data collection practices, and the privacy risks involved In our daily life.

  • International Privacy Overview examines the various legal instruments dealing with privacy, including: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, the Inter American System, and other international privacy instruments.

  • Communications Privacy and Freedom of Expression explores the rights and limitations implied in the right to freedom of expression; anonymity and disclosure of identity; conflicts and challenges related to privacy and freedom of expression; and the role of Internet intermediaries;

  • Surveillance and Human Rights examines International Due Process Standards, transparency reports, Corporate Social Responsibility and the Ruggie Report; the chapter also looks at surveillance across various regions, including the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.

  • Computer Crime, Human Rights and Data Protection talks about computer crime and the human rights perspective, and explains the role in combating cybercrime of some of the main players, including the ITU, OSCE, OECD, BIAC, ITAC, CSISAC, and ICANN;

  • International Data Protection Overview provides an overview of European data protection laws including the Council of Europe Cybercrime Convention and its Additional protocols, the European Union directive on Data Protection, and the EU-US Safe Harbor Agreement. The chapter also explored the OECD’s work in the area of privacy.

  • Emerging Consumer Privacy Topics explores topics and challenges related to consumer privacy, including seeking consent, the right to be forgotten, data portability, data protection by design and by default, security breach notifications, term of services, website cookies, behavioural targeting techniques, facial recognition, CCTVs, and consequences of not following data protection principles. The chapter also explores new developments and their impact on consumer privacy, including social networks and cloud computing.

  • Case study explores the NSA surveillance activities as well as cross border surveillance from domestic soil.

Reviews

The resource materials really provided the necessary preliminary readings for the course and ultimately generated in-depth discourse which helped me especially since the area was new to me.

The participants’ knowledge and experience helped me tremendously in understanding the issues of privacy and data protection. It has encouraged to delve deeper in the area through online learning.

Who should apply

Diplo seeks applications from the following, from both developed and developing countries:

  • End-users with a keen interest in privacy and the protection of their data;
  • Civil society activists in the IG and Information Society fields;
  • Officials in government ministries, departments, or institutions dealing with Information Society, Internet and ICT-related policy issues (e.g. telecommunications, education, foreign affairs, justice);
  • Academics and researchers in the IG field (e.g. in telecommunications, electrical engineering, law, economics, development studies);
  • Journalists covering IG issues; and
  • Individuals in Internet business-related fields (e.g. ISPs, software developers).

This course may also be of interest to:

  • Practising diplomats, civil servants, and others working in international relations who want to refresh or expand their knowledge of specific Internet-related issues, under the guidance of experienced practitioners and academics.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy or international relations wishing to study topics not offered through their university programmes or diplomatic academies and to gain deeper insight through interaction with practising diplomats.
Prerequisites

Applicants are required to have:

  • Either completed the course Introduction to Internet Governance, or have basic knowledge of Internet governance and privacy issues;
  • Sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and submitting written essay assignments);
  • Regular access to the Internet (dial-up connection is sufficient, although broadband is preferable);
  • A minimum of 7-8 hours commitment per week, and the readiness to participate in class online sessions (once a week at specified times).
Fees

The course fee for the thematic certificate course in Privacy and Personal Data Protection is €650.

Applicants must pay full fees upon official acceptance into the course. The fee includes:

  • Full tuition
  • Course orientation pack where applicable (optional readings)
  • Access to all course materials online, via Diplo’s online classroom
  • Personal interaction via the online classroom with course lecturers, staff and other participants
  • Online technical support
  • Postgraduate-level certificate issued by DiploFoundation on successful completion of course requirements (interaction and participation, all assignments)

Financial assistance

A limited number of partial scholarships (maximum 20%) will be offered to participants from developing and emerging countries. Participants who would like to apply for financial assistance must upload the following documents with their application:

  • a CV or resumé;
  • a motivation letter outlining relevant professional and educational background, and interest in the course.

As Diplo's ability to offer scholarship support is limited, candidates are strongly encouraged to seek scholarship funding directly from local or international institutions. Our guide to Finding Scholarships for Online Study may provide you with some useful starting points.

How to apply

Applications for this course are now closed.

For more information about Diplo's Internet governance initiatives, including the Internet Governance Building Programme, visit www.diplomacy.edu/ig, or contact us at ig@diplomacy.edu


Cancellation Policy

Diplo reserves the right to cancel this course if enrolment is insufficient. In case of cancellation, Diplo will notify applicants shortly after the application deadline. Applicants who have paid an application fee may apply this fee towards another course or receive a refund.

Print course info
Course details:

Technological developments have had a considerable impact on privacy, a fundamental right enshrined in nearly every country's constitution.

Stakeholders are concerned with a varying range of privacy issues. For governments, cybersecurity prompts the need for surveillance and effective legislative instruments. For businesses, the collection and processing of personal data is viewed as critical. The architecture of the Internet itself raises new concerns. Often at the opposite end of these issues lays the end-user's need and right for the protection of one's privacy and personal data.

The 10-week course on Privacy and Personal Data Protection delves into the details of many of the global and local discussions surrounding privacy, the main instruments dealing with data protection and information privacy, their effects on national and regional regulations, emerging privacy issues such as anonymous expression, social networks, and cloud computing, the risks and challenges related to cybersecurity concerns, and the roles that companies play in the privacy protection ecosystem.

By the end of the course, participants should:

  • be able to explain the overarching issues involved in Privacy and Personal Data Protection issues, with the complexities and implications (economic, social, professional, political and civic leisure) for individual user rights;
  • be familiar with, and discuss the importance of the principal international privacy instruments including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union;
  • understand the concepts underlying privacy protections, anonymity and the freedom of expression, including the limitations and controversies, and the possible conflicts between privacy and freedom of expression;
  • be able to discuss international due process standards including surveillance, transparency and other reports. Understand different regional situations and contrasts;
  • understand and be able to discuss emerging privacy issues from a government standpoint, such as the secrecy of communications, mandatory data retention, lawful access, encryption and decryption keys, national ID, passports and biometrics, digital rights management (DRM), deep packet inspection (DPI), and spyware;
  • be able to explain what is involved in computer crime, cybersecurity, and privacy, including the positions and discussions taking place in, for example, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Organisation for Security and Co-Operation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF);
  • be able to explain emerging consumer privacy topics such as conditions for consent, the right to be forgotten, data portability, data protection by design and by default, privacy challenges,behavioural targeting techniques, data minimisation and search engines, social networks and data protection, cloud computing, facial recognition and SIM cards.

The course forms part of the Thematic Phase of Diplo’s Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme (IGCBP). This phase offers in-depth courses that provide deeper understanding of a particular issue. Other courses forming part of this phase - which may run simultaneously or at a later date - include Cybersecurity, E-participation, History of Internet Governance, Infrastructure and Critical Internet Resources, Intellectual Property Rights, and ICT Policy and Strategic Planning.

Excerpt from course materials

Social networking applications have been available since the early days of the Internet, in the form of bulletin boards, chat, and multi-user dungeons. Currently, Web 2.0 architecture makes social-oriented applications easy to enter and use, leading to the development of web-based communities gathered around social networking sites, blogs, or wikis. These applications allow users to upload personal information, as detailed as one chooses to disclose, and to make it available to a circle of friends or to all of the website users. However, it is also possible for law enforcement agencies and businesses to obtain the information.

Moreover, the tendency towards ‘thin-client architecture’, where applications are stored on a central server and the interface is just a web browser, also changes the way individuals organise their work and private files. As thin-client architecture is a service offered by private companies, user data is available to their web servers, making lawful access requirements different.

Course outline

The advanced thematic course in Privacy and Personal Data Protection covers the following topics:

  • Introduction to Global Privacy and Data Protection provides an overview of the main themes and defines privacy and data protection; the text analyses whether privacy is a cultural value, and whether it is ‘dead’; it explores traditional and new data collection practices, and the privacy risks involved In our daily life.

  • International Privacy Overview examines the various legal instruments dealing with privacy, including: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights, the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, the Inter American System, and other international privacy instruments.

  • Communications Privacy and Freedom of Expression explores the rights and limitations implied in the right to freedom of expression; anonymity and disclosure of identity; conflicts and challenges related to privacy and freedom of expression; and the role of Internet intermediaries;

  • Surveillance and Human Rights examines International Due Process Standards, transparency reports, Corporate Social Responsibility and the Ruggie Report; the chapter also looks at surveillance across various regions, including the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.

  • Computer Crime, Human Rights and Data Protection talks about computer crime and the human rights perspective, and explains the role in combating cybercrime of some of the main players, including the ITU, OSCE, OECD, BIAC, ITAC, CSISAC, and ICANN;

  • International Data Protection Overview provides an overview of European data protection laws including the Council of Europe Cybercrime Convention and its Additional protocols, the European Union directive on Data Protection, and the EU-US Safe Harbor Agreement. The chapter also explored the OECD’s work in the area of privacy.

  • Emerging Consumer Privacy Topics explores topics and challenges related to consumer privacy, including seeking consent, the right to be forgotten, data portability, data protection by design and by default, security breach notifications, term of services, website cookies, behavioural targeting techniques, facial recognition, CCTVs, and consequences of not following data protection principles. The chapter also explores new developments and their impact on consumer privacy, including social networks and cloud computing.

  • Case study explores the NSA surveillance activities as well as cross border surveillance from domestic soil.

Reviews

The resource materials really provided the necessary preliminary readings for the course and ultimately generated in-depth discourse which helped me especially since the area was new to me.

The participants’ knowledge and experience helped me tremendously in understanding the issues of privacy and data protection. It has encouraged to delve deeper in the area through online learning.

Who should apply:

Diplo seeks applications from the following, from both developed and developing countries:

  • End-users with a keen interest in privacy and the protection of their data;
  • Civil society activists in the IG and Information Society fields;
  • Officials in government ministries, departments, or institutions dealing with Information Society, Internet and ICT-related policy issues (e.g. telecommunications, education, foreign affairs, justice);
  • Academics and researchers in the IG field (e.g. in telecommunications, electrical engineering, law, economics, development studies);
  • Journalists covering IG issues; and
  • Individuals in Internet business-related fields (e.g. ISPs, software developers).

This course may also be of interest to:

  • Practising diplomats, civil servants, and others working in international relations who want to refresh or expand their knowledge of specific Internet-related issues, under the guidance of experienced practitioners and academics.
  • Postgraduate students of diplomacy or international relations wishing to study topics not offered through their university programmes or diplomatic academies and to gain deeper insight through interaction with practising diplomats.
Methodology:

This course is conducted online over a period of ten weeks, including one week of classroom orientation, eight weeks of dynamic class content and activities, and one week for the final assignment. Reading materials and tools for online interaction are provided through an online classroom. Each week, participants read the provided lecture texts, adding comments, references, and questions in the form of hypertext entries. The tutor and other participants read and respond to these entries, creating interaction based on the lecture text. During the week, participants complete additional online activities (e.g. further discussion via blogs or forums or quizzes). At the end of the week, participants and tutors meet online in a chat room to discuss the week’s topic.

Courses are based on a collaborative approach to learning, involving a high level of interaction. This course requires a minimum of 7-8 hours of study time per week.

Participants are invited to join Diplo’s global Internet governance online community of over 1,400 members, and to attend monthly webinars and other IG-related events and activities.

The course materials, the e-learning platform, and the working language of the course is English. Applicants should consider whether their reading and writing skills in English are sufficient to follow postgraduate level materials and discussion.

Prerequisites:

Applicants are required to have:

  • Either completed the course Introduction to Internet Governance, or have basic knowledge of Internet governance and privacy issues;
  • Sufficient ability in the English language to undertake postgraduate level studies (including reading academic texts, discussing complex concepts with other course participants, and submitting written essay assignments);
  • Regular access to the Internet (dial-up connection is sufficient, although broadband is preferable);
  • A minimum of 7-8 hours commitment per week, and the readiness to participate in class online sessions (once a week at specified times).
Fees:

The course fee for the thematic certificate course in Privacy and Personal Data Protection is €650.

Applicants must pay full fees upon official acceptance into the course. The fee includes:

  • Full tuition
  • Course orientation pack where applicable (optional readings)
  • Access to all course materials online, via Diplo’s online classroom
  • Personal interaction via the online classroom with course lecturers, staff and other participants
  • Online technical support
  • Postgraduate-level certificate issued by DiploFoundation on successful completion of course requirements (interaction and participation, all assignments)

Financial assistance

A limited number of partial scholarships (maximum 20%) will be offered to participants from developing and emerging countries. Participants who would like to apply for financial assistance must upload the following documents with their application:

  • a CV or resumé;
  • a motivation letter outlining relevant professional and educational background, and interest in the course.

As Diplo's ability to offer scholarship support is limited, candidates are strongly encouraged to seek scholarship funding directly from local or international institutions. Our guide to Finding Scholarships for Online Study may provide you with some useful starting points.

How to apply:

Applications for this course are now closed.

For more information about Diplo's Internet governance initiatives, including the Internet Governance Building Programme, visit www.diplomacy.edu/ig, or contact us at ig@diplomacy.edu


Cancellation Policy

Diplo reserves the right to cancel this course if enrolment is insufficient. In case of cancellation, Diplo will notify applicants shortly after the application deadline. Applicants who have paid an application fee may apply this fee towards another course or receive a refund.